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Minor Fictional Characters in The Two Georges

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This article lists the various minor fictional characters who appear in The Two Georges. These characters play at best a peripheral role in the novel. Most were simply mentioned or had a very brief, unimportant speaking role that impacted the plot minimally, if at all, and never appeared again. Some were not even given a name.

Benjamin ArthursEdit

Benjamin Arthurs was a Brigadier in the Royal American Mounted Police. He was earnest, affable, and not very bright, and spent several years not noticing the Sons of Liberty infiltration of his department. Following the resolution of The Two Georges crisis, he was in charge of the purge of any Sons within the Victoria RAM office, leaving a large part of the actual work to Thomas Bushell.[1]

Jonas BarberEdit

Jonas Barber was the town council president of New Liverpool. He was a plump little man with a shiny bald head. He was present in the governor's mansion when The Two Georges was stolen by the Sons of Liberty.[2]

Marcella BarberEdit

Marcella Barber was the wife of Jonas Barber, the town council president of New Liverpool. She was several inches taller than her husband and an elegant looking woman. She was present in the governor's mansion when The Two Georges was stolen by the Sons of Liberty.[3]

BenjaminEdit

Benjamin (d. 1995) was a member of the Sons of Liberty. He lived in Buckley Bay on the Queen Charlotte Islands for several years. He was a suspect in a gunrunning ring, smuggling Russian made rifles to the QCI and then mailing them throughout the North American Union from Skidegate.[4] He was killed in a gun-battle with Colonel Thomas Bushell.[5]

John BurnettEdit

John Burnett was the Governor of Upper California. He was a bluff, ruddy, and florid, with a fringe of gingery beard.[6]

He was present when The Two Georges was stolen by the Sons of Liberty. The painting was on a tour of the North American Union and was on a VIP display in the governor's mansion in New Liverpool. As a diversion, a Sons gunman shot "Honest" Dick the Steamer King dead. While the police and guests were distracted, three Sons disguised in Royal American Mounted Police uniforms overpowered the two RAM guards and made off with the painting.[7]

Stella BurnettEdit

Stella Burnett was the wife of Upper California Governor John Burnett. She had a sallow complexion. She was present in the governor's mansion in New Liverpool when The Two Georges was stolen by the Sons of Liberty.[8]

Dermot ConevalEdit

Dermot Coneval was Michael O'Flynn's cousin. He sold beer for Phineas Stanage's brewery in Georgestown.[9]

Hiram DefoeEdit

Hiram Defoe was the postage minister of the North American Union and Sir Martin Luther King's chief political fixer. It was said that if he didn't know everything and everyone, then he made a good game try of not letting on. As postage minister, he was the political head of the NAU's postal system.

He accompanied Sir Martin on the train from Victoria to New Liverpool when The Two Georges was stolen.[10]

Malcolm DesmondEdit

Doctor Malcolm Desmond was a Thomas Gainsborough scholar. He accompanied The Two Georges on its North American Union tour when the Sons of Liberty stole it in New Liverpool. His security dossier indicated he had been expelled from a preparatory school for unnatural vice. While this might have been a factor in another case, the Sons of Liberty despised this sort of thing far more than the authorities, so it was unlikely that Dr. Desmond was one of them.[11]

DewasentaEdit

Dewasenta was an Iroquois of the Turtle clan and a civilian employee of the Doshoweh Constabulary. There she performed secretarial / clerical work. An exceedingly decorative young woman, Lt. Charles Lucas alluded to her beauty when she delivered paperwork to Major Shikalimo during a meeting regarding the theft of The Two Georges. For a moment Shikalimo was nonplused, then understood what Lucas was getting at. He explained that she was of the Turtle clan while he was of the Bear clan and didn't think of her in that way.[12]

A few days later, Dewasenta typed up several copies of a list of suspects in the theft whose given names were variations of "Joe" for a second meeting that Major Shikalimo had with the RAM.[13]

Obadiah J. DrinkwaterEdit

Obadiah J. Drinkwater was a Lieutenant in the Royal American Mounted Police. Following the conclusion of The Two Georges affair, he came under inspection for ties to a pro-treason organisation and faced dismissal.[14]

Chauncey DupuyEdit

Chauncey Dupuy was a reporter for the New Orleans Herald-Leader and Picayune. Several days after the theft of The Two Georges, the Herald received a copy of the ransom demand. Dupuy telephoned Colonel Thomas Bushell for an interview. Bushell confirmed that he had received the ransom and that the photograph accompanying it appeared genuine. He confirmed that the ransom demand of 50 million pounds was the largest ever in the North American Union. He also confirmed that the demand had been passed on to Sir Martin Luther King and that he did not know whether Sir Martin intended to meet it.[15]

Edward IX of BritainEdit

Edward IX was a 20th-century King-Emperor of the British Empire.

Literary commentEdit

Thomas Bushell's rhetorical thought that a building's paint job hasn't been improved since the reign of Edward IX, is the only clue to this monarch's existence.[16] No years or relations are mentioned. However, the compact timeline from the posthumously referenced Edward VIII to the current Charles III, suggests that these three succeeded each other, and that Edward IX is probably the son of Edward VIII, who was childless in OTL.

Regnal titles
(The Two Georges)
Preceded by
Edward VIII
(presumed)
King-Emperor of the British Empire
1972(?)-1990(?)
Succeeded by
Charles III
(presumed)

Zachariah James FentonEdit

Zachariah James "Zack" Fenton was a suspected member of the Sons of Liberty. In 1995 Captain Jaime Macias of the New Liverpool Police found sufficient evidence to arrest Fenton for the murder of "Honest" Dick. On searching his home, the police discovered a recently discharged Nagant rifle which they hoped forensic study would show was the murder weapon. In addition to the Russian made rifle the police found forty-eight Lebel revolvers, thirty-five Eibar revolvers, twenty-seven Astra Modelo 200 pistols, twenty-nine Lebel military rifles and three Chauchat light military machine guns. They also discovered ₤219,827 in gold and silver currency in the form of livres d'or and pesos and 943 pounds of coca leaf extract.

When Captain Macias informed Colonel Thomas Bushell of this, it puzzled him since the related case of the theft of The Two Georges had had a Russian connection but all the weapons and money were from the Franco-Spanish Holy Alliance.

Aloysius FlanneryEdit

Aloysius Flannery was the father of Dr. Kathleen Flannery. He bought her a subscription to Common Sense each year due to his sympathies with its cause. Dr. Flannery did not share this political view but the fact she had a subscription cast further suspicion on her when The Two Georges was stolen in New Liverpool.

FoxxEdit

Doctor Foxx was the New Liverpool coroner and attended "Honest" Dick's murder the night The Two Georges was stolen by the Sons of Liberty. His findings were that "Honest" Dick might have survived his throat wound but the second head-shot was instantly fatal.

He also treated the two Royal American Mounted Police officers who had been overpowered and chloroformed by the Sons.[17]

François IV of France and SpainEdit

François IV Bourbon was the monarch of the Franco-Spanish Holy Alliance in the late 20th Century.[18] He held court at Versailles.[19]

Regnal titles
(The Two Georges)
Preceded by
Last known is
Louis XVI
King of France
Late 20th century
Succeeded by
Incumbent at novel's end, 1995
Preceded by
Last known is
Carlos III
King of Spain
Late 20th century
Succeeded by
Incumbent at novel's end, 1995

GeoffEdit

Geoff (d. 1995) was a member of the Sons of Liberty. He lived in Buckley Bay on the Queen Charlotte Islands for several years. He was a suspect in a gunrunning ring, smuggling Russian made rifles to the QCI and then mailing them throughout the North American Union from Skidegate.[20] He was killed in a gun-battle with Colonel Thomas Bushell.[21]

Elgin GoldsmithEdit

Elgin Goldsmith was a member of the Sons of Liberty. He lived in Buckley Bay on the Queen Charlotte Islands for several years. He was a suspect in a gunrunning ring, smuggling Russian made rifles to the QCI and then mailing them throughout the North American Union from Skidegate.[22] He was wounded in a gun-battle with Colonel Thomas Bushell and captured.

Goldsmith's wounds were minor: a through-and-through bullet wound in the shoulder and a flesh wound in the leg. As such, Bushell was able to question him but he refused to answer, claiming probably correctly that he would hang regardless. Sgt. Fuller suggested Bushell take a stroll in the woods and that he would make Goldsmith sing but Bushell turned down the offer. Goldsmith's subsequent gloating nearly made him change his mind but in the end he chose to respect the law he was sworn to uphold.[23]

GyantwakaEdit

Doctor Gyantwaka was the associated curator of Iroquois art at the All-Union Art Museum. After The Two Georges was stolen, he recognized the newspaper in the photograph accompanying the ransom demand as that of the Doshoweh Sentinel. He informed Dr. Kathleen Flannery who set off to The Six Nations to investigate.[24]

HartnettEdit

Hartnett was a pharmacist’s mate on board the HMS Grampus. In 1995 he treated four wounded Royal Marines and a surviving Sons of Liberty who were injured in a gun battle as Colonel Thomas Bushell attempted to make a set of arrests. Hartnett was satisfied with most of the first aid that had been administered but changed the splint on Private Metcalf's leg.[25]

HiramEdit

Hiram was one of the two RAMs guarding The Two Georges when the Sons of Liberty stole it. Three white men in RAM uniforms entered the Cardigan Room and pulled out revolvers. While one of the false RAMs covered him, the other two went behind Hiram and the other guard and stuck sponges soaked in chloroform into their faces. Both guards were rendered unconscious and the Sons stole the painting.[26]

Friedrich-Maria von HötzendorfEdit

Graf Friedrich-Maria von Hötzendorf was the Austrian ambassador to the North American Union. He was a short, thin, weary-looking man with sad-eyes. The Graf wished Thomas Bushell well in the search for The Two Georges painting, and was overwhelmed in trying to imagine combing through such a large country, as he came from a fairly small "Empire".[27]

HuygensEdit

Judge Huygens was on the King's Bench in New Liverpool when The Two Georges was stolen by the Sons of Liberty. He was approached by Captain Samuel Stanley requesting warrants in aid of the investigation. While known for being more cooperative with the Royal American Mounted Police than most, he outdid himself on this occasion. He issued a dozen warrants with the lines for dates, names and addresses left blank. This was a compliment of sorts, to be entrusted with blank warrants but one not to be abused since otherwise it would call into disrepute the legal system.[28]

Peter JarroldEdit

Peter Jarrold was a member of the Sons of Liberty and a convicted arsonist. He was in his early twenties, tough looking with a scar over one eye and another on his chin. He, like a lot of younger Sons, wore his hair cropped short in the "Roundhead" fashion.

At the time of the theft of The Two Georges, Jarrold had just started a ten year sentence for setting fire to a synagogue in New Liverpool the previous winter.[29]

JohnstonEdit

Corporal Johnston commanded a ten man squad in Lt. Morton Green's platoon of Royal Marines on the Queen Charlotte Islands. He was a tall, thin man.

He, his squad and the squad of Corp. Wainwright along with Lt. Green and Sgt. Fuller, were assigned by Cmdr. Nathan Hairston to assist Colonel Thomas Bushell in his investigation of the theft of The Two Georges. He and the other Marines accompanied Bushell to Buckley Bay to assist in the capture of four suspected Sons of Liberty.

When they had reached the outskirts of the town, Johnston and his squad waited with Green and the RAMs as Fuller and Wainwright circled the town and entered it from the south using move-and-support tactics. Johnston and Green did the same, each moving with half the squad while the other half stayed in cover to give supporting fire if needed.

Alexa JonesEdit

Alexa Jones (b. early 1950s) was the wife of American Tory Party chairman Sir Devereaux Jones. She was a striking blonde who spoke in the accent of a southeastern province, possibly Georgia or South Carolina.[30]

Devereaux JonesEdit

Sir Devereaux Jones was the American Tory Party chairman. He was a Negro man, ebony dark with a clever and closed face. Alexa Jones was his wife.

He accompanied Sir Martin Luther King on the train trip from Victoria to New Liverpool when The Two Georges was stolen.[31]

Archbishop KennedyEdit

Archbishop Kennedy was the head of the Catholic Archdiocese of Boston, Massachusetts. His brother John Kennedy was the publisher of Common Sense, the official journal of the Independence Party which advocated complete autonomy for the North American Union.

During an argument with John Kennedy, Colonel Thomas Bushell of the Royal American Mounted Police concluded that he would have better luck convincing Archbishop Kennedy to become a Baptist than he would convincing John Kennedy that the British Empire did North America more good than harm.[32]

Literary commentEdit

There is a tentative consensus among readers that Archbishop Kennedy is Robert Kennedy, due to his devout Catholicism in OTL. While this hypothesis is reasonable, and was formerly endorsed by this wiki, the novel falls short of giving concrete confirmation.

Andrew KincaidEdit

Andrew Kincaid (d. ca. 1990) was a member of the Sons of Liberty in New Liverpool. One night, he assaulted a Sikh with a length of lead pipe, striking at the man's head and shouting "Go back to India, you stinking wog". The Sikh, true to the martial tenets of his faith, was armed with a dagger and fought back killing Kincaid. This was clearly self defence so the Sikh was not charged.[33]

LansingEdit

Doctor Lansing was a physician with a private practice in Port Clements. In 1995 he treated four wounded Royal Marines and an injured terrorist that were brought from Buckley Bay by the HMS Grampus. He drove the town's ambulance steamer with several of the injured marines to Skidegate while a sailor drove the doctor's private steamer with the rest of the wounded.[34]

Kyril LozovskyEdit

Kyril Lozovsky was the assistant commercial secretary at the Russian ministry in Victoria. He had been engaged to Doctor Kathleen Flannery in the early 1990s but she had ended the engagement when she found out he had a second fiancée back in Tsaritsyn. He returned to Russia shortly after and married the other woman.[35]

Charles LucasEdit

Lieutenant Charles Lucas was with the Doshoweh detachment of the Royal American Mounted Police.

In 1995 he and his superior Capt. Sylvanus Greeley and Major Shikalimo of the constabulary met Colonel Thomas Bushell and Captain Samuel Stanley at the Doshoweh train station to assist them in their investigation of the theft of The Two Georges.

The next day Lucas was invited to attend a meeting in Shikalimo's office. On being introduced to Dr. Kathleen Flannery, his face showed polite horror but since Col. Bushell outranked him, he said nothing.

A few days later, Major Shikalimo had a second meeting to report on the results of his investigation and invited Lt. Lucas directly. He reviewed the list of "Joes" that Shikalimo provided but none seemed suspicious. He expressed regret on the death of Lt. Col. Felix Crooke as he was the RAM's Sons of Liberty expert.

John MartinEdit

Captain John Martin was an officer with the Royal American Mounted Police at its headquarters in Victoria. He met Col. Thomas Bushell, Capt. Samuel Stanley and Dr. Kathleen Flannery at Victoria Station when their train arrived during the course of their investigation of the theft of The Two Georges. He explained he had booked rooms at the William and Mary Hotel for the two men but hadn't realized Dr. Flannery was traveling with them and so had nothing for her. However, since Dr. Flannery was a local and had her own residence in town, this wouldn't present a problem. His main concern was that hotels in Victoria had been fully booked with the announced visit by the King-Emperor, Charles III.[36]

Dr. Flannery was not satisfied and insisted that she needed to continue to work closely with the two RAMs. Rather than be belligerent about it, she used charm and her physical attractiveness to convince Capt. Martin to take her along to the hotel despite his misgivings. Being human and male, Martin did so. When the hotel managed to rearrange things so Dr. Flannery also had a room, Capt. Martin took his leave telling them that a driver would be available for their use and to feel free to contact him if they needed anything else.[37]

MetcalfEdit

Private Metcalf was a Royal Marine. In 1995 he was stationed on the Queen Charlotte Islands and was a member of one of the two squads assigned by Cmdr. Nathan Hairston to assist Colonel Thomas Bushell in apprehending four suspected Sons of Liberty in Buckley Bay. During the attempted arrest, a gun battle ensued and Metcalf was the most seriously wounded of four Marines with a bullet shattering his ankle.[38]

Metcalf received immediate first aid from his fellow marines and then was treated by Hartnett, a pharmacist’s mate from HMS Grampus who re-splinted his leg. He was then carried by stretcher to the Grampus and transported back to Port Clements.[39]

Donald MortonEdit

Donald Morton was a lake-shipping magnate who resided in Doshoweh, The Six Nations. In 1995 his outspoken criticisms of the Iroquois drew the attention of the authorities investigating the theft of The Two Georges. While not personally a suspect, he was investigated for associates named "Joe" based on a letter discovered by Colonel Thomas Bushell.[40]

Augustus NorthgateEdit

Augustus Northgate was a grocer who operated in Doshoweh, The Six Nations. In 1995 his outspoken criticisms of the Iroquois drew the attention of the authorities investigating the theft of The Two Georges. While not personally a suspect, he was investigated for associates named "Joe" based on a letter discovered by Colonel Thomas Bushell.[41]

O'LearyEdit

O'Leary was a muscular man with green eyes, carroty hair, and a face full of freckles. He worked as a luggage loader for Sunset Airships Ltd. at the New Liverpool airship port. He recognized Colonel Thomas Bushell as the chap trying to get The Two Georges back when he went to load the latter’s bags onto the Empire Builder. He expressed his hopes that Bushell succeed and that he catch the "right bunch 'o bastards" who stole it.[42]

Roland OliverEdit

Roland Oliver was a prosecuting attorney for the province of Virginia. He was married to Captain Patricia Oliver, an officer with the Royal American Mounted Police, who often cuckolded him.

Note: for the similarly named minor fictional character in Southern Victory, see Oliver Roland.

OtetianiEdit

Otetiani was the Grand Sachem of the Iroquois in 1995 when The Two Georges was stolen by the Sons of Liberty. When the investigation led to The Six Nations, his nephew and heir Major Shikalimo assisted Colonel Thomas Bushell in his investigation.[43]

Christopher ParkerEdit

Christopher Parker was the scene designer for the North American Union tour of The Two Georges when the Sons of Liberty stole it in New Liverpool. His security dossier indicated he had two arrests for driving a steamer while intoxicated. While a depraved act, it was unlikely to make Parker a Sons of Liberty member.[44]

PatrickEdit

Patrick (d. 1995) was a member of the Sons of Liberty. He lived in Buckley Bay on the Queen Charlotte Islands for several years. He was a suspect in a gunrunning ring, smuggling Russian made rifles to the QCI and then mailing them throughout the North American Union from Skidegate.[45] He was killed in a gun-battle with RAM Colonel Thomas Bushell.[46]

Sergei PavlovEdit

Sergei Pavlov was the Russian Empire's consul in New Liverpool. When not performing his diplomatic duties, he was the leading wholesaler of caviar and vodka in the city.

He was a guest in the governor's mansion when The Two Georges was stolen by the Sons of Liberty.[47]

Spencer PendletonEdit

Spencer Pendleton was a dentist in Victoria, North American Union. Lt. General Sir Horace Bragg of the Royal American Mounted Police was a patient of his. Bragg told Thomas Bushell that he was having his teeth treated by Pendleton on at least two occasions in August. When Bushell tried to contact Bragg during one of these surgeries, he was told by office staff that Bragg had not had any appointment or visited the office since February. This, combined with other recent revelations about Bragg, caused Bushell to wonder what other lies his friend and commander might have told.

Duke of PhiladelphiaEdit

The Duke of Philadelphia had a daughter whose kidnapping around 1945 was considered the crime of the century. The 1995 theft of The Two Georges was the most sensational crime at any point since then.

Literary commentEdit

Although there is a popular readers' consensus that this crime is meant to be analogous to the case of Charles Lindbergh's son, the administrators have found no in-story evidence to confirm this.

Walter PineEdit

Doctor Walter Pine was a historian specialising in the reign of King George III. He accompanied The Two Georges on its North American Union tour when the Sons of Liberty stole it in New Liverpool. His security dossier indicated he had signed several petitions protesting the NAU's conciliatory stance in border negotiations with the Holy Alliance. At least one of those petitions had been circulated by the Independence Party, the legal political wing of the Sons of Liberty. How much that meant, Colonel Thomas Bushell couldn't say.[48]

Rob PratsonEdit

Rob Pratson was plump, bald, red-faced man. He was the postmaster in Skidegate on the Queen Charlotte Islands.

Colonel Thomas Bushell interviewed Pratson in connection to the theft of The Two Georges. Bushell asked if Pratson recalled anyone mailing a long narrow package. To Bushell's dismay he recalled many such packages being mailed in the previous six months. They had been mailed by four men: Geoff, Patrick, Elgin and Benjamin. They all lived in an abandoned logging town called Buckley Bay on the west shore of Masset Inlet for the previous two or three years. They made a living by hunting and fishing and by occasionally guiding tourists to the best fishing spots.[49]

Martin RooseveltEdit

Martin Roosevelt was a Governor-General of the North American Union in the early 20th Century. He was remembered for piloting his own airship; rumour had it that he frequently took pretty girls up with him when he flew.

In 1995, Roosevelt's portrait was one of a number of former Governors-General displayed in America's Number 10, the Governor-General's residence in Victoria.[50]

Literary commentEdit

Martin Roosevelt seems to be a genetic analog of Theodore Roosevelt and/or Franklin D. Roosevelt, combining Theodore's adventurousness with Franklin's lechery.

Political offices
(The Two Georges)
Preceded by
Last known is
Stephen Douglas
Governor-General of the North American Union
Early 20th century
Succeeded by
Next known is
Sir Martin Luther King

Roy SaundersEdit

Roy Saunders was the deputy minister of the exchequer for the North American Union. As such, he was the senior professional (as opposed to political) civil servant responsible for the NAU's species and banknotes. He was thin and sandy and acerbic.

He accompanied Sir Martin Luther King on the train trip from Victoria to New Liverpool when The Two Georges was stolen.[51] Sir Martin later ordered Saunders to put together the 50 million pounds in gold to meet the Sons of Liberty's ransom if the painting was not recovered.[52]

Sgt. SinghEdit

Sergeant Singh was with the New Liverpool Police and a forensics specialist. He dusted the Cardigan Room (the place The Two Georges was hung when the Sons of Liberty stole it) and a mechanical phonograph the Sons left behind but failed to find any fingerprints. He gloomily concluded that the Sons must have been very careful to not leave behind any evidence.[53]

SmithersEdit

Smithers was the chief of the Royal American Mounted Police's Upper California section in New Liverpool. On his retirement, Colonel Thomas Bushell transferred from Victoria to take over the position.[54]

Marcus Aurelius StimpsonEdit

Marcus Aurelius "Chalky" Stimpson was the resident tailor for the Royal American Mounted Police in their headquarters in Victoria. He was a tall, thin, pale, slightly stooped man of indeterminate age somewhere between 65 and 85 although Thomas Bushell joked he had been around since at least William the Conqueror. The nickname of "Chalky" came from his ever present tailor's chalk.

Bushell and Capt. Samuel Stanley fell into Stimpson's clutches during their investigation of the theft of The Two Georges. The information Bushell had brought led General Sir Horace Bragg to authorize a series of raids on suspected Sons of Liberty but he also decided that Bushell and Stanley would accompany him to a reception that night at the Russian Embassy. As such, the two needed formal dress uniforms fitted to perfection and so he took them to see "Chalky".

Stimpson grumbled that Bragg hadn't given him enough time but then fell to it. He took two tunics and pairs of trousers from the rack and had the two put them on. He then went at it with tape measure, pins and chalk working with his ancient foot-powered sewing machine. A braver man than Bushell would suggest he switch to a more modern electric model.

Finally, after spending the afternoon with the pair, Stimpson was satisfied. However, as Bushell relaxed and lit a cigar, Stimpson said he had one more thing for them. Stanley exclaimed in horror that he had already done enough but Stimpson, with a twinkle in his eye, asked innocently whether they wanted clubs to beat off all the lovely ladies their new uniforms would attract.[55]

James StonebreakerEdit

James Stonebreaker was, ironically, a stone mason who worked in Doshoweh, The Six Nations. In 1995 his outspoken criticisms of the Iroquois drew the attention of the authorities investigating the theft of The Two Georges. While not personally a suspect, he was investigated for associates named "Joe" based on a letter discovered by Colonel Thomas Bushell.[56]

Robert ThirkettleEdit

Robert Thirkettle was a lieutenant in the Royal American Mounted Police and the public information officer in the RAM's Upper California Section HQ in New Liverpool. Colonel Thomas Bushell reluctantly asked him to arrange a news conference with the press the afternoon after the Sons of Liberty stole the The Two Georges.[57]

Several days later Colonel Bushell received a ransom demand from the Sons. He was flooded by telephone calls from reporters since the Sons had sent copies of the demand to newspapers across America. After fielding a number of calls himself, he asked the switchboard to direct all further inquiries to Thirkettle.[58]

WainwrightEdit

Corporal Wainwright commanded a ten man squad in Lt. Morton Green's platoon of Royal Marines on the Queen Charlotte Islands. He was a short, heavyset man.

He, his squad and the squad of Corp. Johnston along with Lt. Green and Sgt. Fuller, were assigned by Cmdr. Nathan Hairston to assist Colonel Thomas Bushell in his investigation of the theft of The Two Georges. He and the other Marines accompanied Bushell to Buckley Bay to assist in the capture of four suspected Sons of Liberty.

When they had reached the outskirts of the town, Green sent Fuller, Wainwright and his squad circling around the town to the south. After reaching their position they entered the town using move-and-support tactics. Wainwright and half his squad would sprint forward and find cover while Fuller and the other half would be prepared to give supporting fire if needed. Then Fuller would sprint while Wainwright gave support.

Yeoman WashingtonEdit

Yeoman Washington was with the Royal North American Navy. In 1995 he was stationed on the Queen Charlotte Islands and assigned clerical duties in Commander Nathan Hairston's Security Detachment. He took Colonel Thomas Bushell's statement regarding his attempt to arrest four Sons of Liberty in Buckley Bay and the resulting gun battle that left three Sons, two Royal Marines and RAM Lt. Col. Felix Crooke dead. After recording Bushell's statement in shorthand, Washington typed it out for his signature.[59]

Harrington WilberforceEdit

Harrington Wilberforce was Governor John Burnett's secretary and office administrator when The Two Georges was stolen by the Sons of Liberty. He was present at the mansion when the infamous crime was committed and assisted in the investigation by providing Colonel Thomas Bushell and Captain Samuel Stanley with private offices to interview the witnesses.

He was a tall, dignified Negro man and indispensable to Governor Burnett's office running smoothly.

Edward WoodbridgeEdit

Lieutenant Commander Edward Woodbridge was the captain of HMS Grampus. Early one morning in 1995, he transported Colonel Thomas Bushell, his two companions and two squads of Royal Marines from Port Clements to about five miles north of Buckley Bay. At noon of the same day Woodbridge and his ship returned directly to Buckley Bay to pick-up Bushell and any prisoners he might have.

Woodbridge was the first to learn of the gun battle that had taken place when the Sons of Liberty resisted arrest. He provided medical assistance to the wounded through Hartnett, a pharmacist’s mate on board his ship and transported the survivors and their one prisoner back to Port Clements. He also wirelessed ahead to have Doctor Lansing meet them at the wharf. Finally, he provided Bushell and Capt. Samuel Stanley with a private compartment for them to study the evidence they had collected.

Solomon YorkEdit

Solomon York was a printer who operated in Doshoweh, The Six Nations. In 1995 his outspoken criticisms of the Iroquois drew the attention of the authorities investigating the theft of The Two Georges. While not personally a suspect, he was investigated for associates named "Joe" based on a letter discovered by Colonel Thomas Bushell.

Bushell did entertain some suspicions given his previous investigation of two printers in New Liverpool but nothing came of it.[60]

ReferencesEdit

  1. The Two Georges, pg. 592, MPB.
  2. Ibid., pg. 22, MPB.
  3. Ibid.
  4. Ibid., pgs. 181-183, MPB.
  5. Ibid., pgs. 209-210, MPB.
  6. Ibid., pg. 22, MPB.
  7. Ibid., pgs. 36-43, MPB.
  8. Ibid., pg. 22, MPB.
  9. Ibid., p. 341, HC.
  10. Ibid., pg. 119, MPB.
  11. Ibid., pg. 74, MPB.
  12. Ibid., pgs. 269-270, MPB.
  13. Ibid., pg. 278, MPB.
  14. Ibid., p. 380, HC.
  15. Ibid., pg. 145, MPB.
  16. Ibid., pg. 306, MPB.
  17. Ibid., pg. 44 MPB.
  18. Ibid., p. 290, HC.
  19. Ibid., p. 291-292.
  20. Ibid., pgs. 181-183, MPB.
  21. Ibid., pgs. 209-210, MPB.
  22. Ibid., pgs. 181-183, MPB.
  23. Ibid., pgs. 212-214, MPB.
  24. Ibid., pg. 258, MPB.
  25. Ibid., pgs. 221-222, MPB.
  26. Ibid., pgs. 54-55, MPB.
  27. Ibid., p. 320 HC.
  28. Ibid., pgs. 92-93, MPB.
  29. Ibid., pg. 86, MPB.
  30. Ibid., p. 292-293, HC.
  31. Ibid., pg. 119, MPB.
  32. The Two Georges, pg. 362, pb.
  33. Ibid., pg. 87, MPB.
  34. Ibid., pg. 229-230, MPB.
  35. Ibid., pg. 59, MPB.
  36. Ibid., pgs. 420-421, MPB.
  37. Ibid, pgs. 421, 423-424.
  38. Ibid., pg. 211, MPB.
  39. Ibid., pg. 222, MPB.
  40. Ibid., pg. 277, MPB.
  41. Ibid., pg. 277, MPB.
  42. Ibid., pg. 163, MPB.
  43. Ibid., pgs. 250-251, MPB.
  44. Ibid., pg. 74, MPB.
  45. Ibid., pgs. 181-183, MPB.
  46. Ibid., pgs. 209-210, MPB.
  47. Ibid., pg. 33, MPB.
  48. Ibid., pg. 74, MPB.
  49. Ibid., pgs. 181-183, MPB.
  50. Ibid., pg. 430 pb, 281 hc.
  51. Ibid., pg. 119, MPB.
  52. Ibid., pg. 434.
  53. Ibid., pgs. 44-45 MPB.
  54. Ibid., pg. 124, MPB.
  55. Ibid., pgs. 438-440, MPB.
  56. Ibid., pg. 277, MPB.
  57. Ibid., pg. 72, MPB.
  58. Ibid., pg. 145, MPB.
  59. Ibid., pgs. 230-231, MPB.
  60. Ibid., pgs. 277-278, MPB.

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