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These are the professional and semipro baseball teams that appear in The House of Daniel. Most are fictional analogs of teams that really existed.

ProfessionalEdit

Boston Golden CodsEdit

The Golden Cods were a professional team from Boston. A talented young rookie from San Diego joined the Golden Cods for a stint.[1]

Literary commentEdit

The Golden Cods are analogs of the Boston Red Sox.

Kansas City RegentsEdit

The Kansas City Regents were a colored professional team from Kansas City. Carpetbag Booker had played with them in the past. The Regents were one of two colored teams that played in the semi-pro tournament in Denver in June, 1934.[2]

The Regents played in the second game, handily beating the Denver Half-Soles, 11-4. The crowd still loudly cheered on the Half-Soles and yelled racist comments at the Regents. Jack Spivey noted that the Half-Soles didn't belong on the field with the Regents, and were only there because they were from Denver and they were white.[3]

The Regents made it far into the tournament, finally falling to the Cheyenne Buffaloes on the third day of play, 5-2.[4]

Literary commentEdit

The Regents are analogs of the Kansas City Monarchs, the longest-running franchise in the history of baseball's Negro Leagues.

Minneapolis MoosesEdit

The Mooses were a minor league team from Minneapolis. In 1938, a talented young rookie from San Diego joined the Mooses, and quickly became their star player.[5]

Literary commentEdit

The Mooses are based on the minor league Minneapolis Millers.

New York HilltoppersEdit

The New York Hilltoppers were a professional baseball team from New York City. They were probably the best major league team. The House of Daniel were the equivalent of the New York Hilltoppers of the semi-pros.[6]

Literary commentEdit

The Hilltoppers are analogs of the New York Yankees. The Yankees were originally called the New York Highlanders.

Philadelphia QuakersEdit

The Quakers were a professional team from Philadelphia. Benjamin Harrison Caesar one of the best pitchers in the history of the game, played for the Quakers for period. His alcoholism eventually forced him out of the big leagues.[7]

Literary commentEdit

The Quakers are analogs of the Philadelphia Phillies, who were originally called the Quakers when the were founded in 1883.

Pittsburgh CrawdadsEdit

The Pittsburgh Crawdads were one of the best colored teams in the country. Players of note included pitcher Carpetbag Booker and catcher Job Gregson, who were some of the best players in the game.[8] Their manager was Quail Jennings[9]

While the House of Daniel was in Albuquerque, Carpetbag Booker agreed to Harv Watrous' offer to play for the House at the semi-pro tournament in Denver in June.[10] Ironically, the Crawdads themselves were also playing in the tournament.[11]

The Crawdads played the Waco Wildcats in the sixth game of the tournament, winning spectacularly, 12-1. When they saw they were losing, the Wildcats started throwing at the Crawdads, and making hard slides. The game didn't quite become a brawl, though.[12] Two days later, the Crawdads defeated the Salt Lake City Industries and advanced to the finals, where they would play against the House of Daniel AND Carpetbag Booker.[13]

Literary CommentEdit

The Crawdads are based on the Pittsburgh Crawfords, a Negro League pro-team that played from 1931-1940.

St. Louis ArchdeaconsEdit

The St. Louis Archdeacons were a professional baseball team in St. Louis. The semi-pro barnstorming team the House of Daniel actually beat the Archdeacons once.[14]

Literary commentEdit

The Archdeacons are analogs of the St. Louis Cardinals.

San Diego FriarsEdit

The Friars were a PCL team from San Diego. A talented young semipro player from San Diego played a season and a half with the Friars before moving on to the Boston Golden Cods.[15]

Literary commentEdit

The Friars are based on the San Diego Padres.

Tokyo TitansEdit

The Tokyo Titans were a professional team from Tokyo, Japan. They sometimes went to the United States to barnstorm during their off-seasons. They were an excellent team. The House of Daniel beat them once in 1932, though House manager Harv Watrous conceded it could have gone the other way.[16]

Literary commentEdit

The Titans appear to be partial analogs of the Yomiuri Giants, a team based in Bunkyo, a ward of Tokyo.

Semi-ProEdit

Alamogordo RebelsEdit

The Alamogordo Rebels were the semipro team of Alamogordo, New Mexico. Their name was a nod to the South's attempt to take New Mexico during the States' War. Their outfielder, Mike Lee, was of Chinese descent.[17]

The House of Daniel played the Rebels in May, 1934. The Rebels didn't have a park, so they played on the high school's field. Consequently, the take was pretty small overall.[18]

Alpine CatsEdit

The Alpine Cats were the semipro team of Alpine, Texas A local rancher named Kokernot had invested heavily in the Cats, even recruiting and paying for good players.[19] The House of Daniel played the Cats in May, 1934. The game proved interesting, as it became rough in short order. Moreover, it was tied 3-3 at the ninth, and so had to go into extra innings. By the 19th inning, the game was called on account of darkness.[20]

Amarillo MetrosEdit

The Amarillo Metros were a semipro team based in Amarillo, Texas. Prior to the Big Bubble bursting, they'd been in Western League for a few years. By May, 1934, they were out of that league, but still a pretty good team for that level.[21] Metro Park was a professional ballyard.[22]

During their game with the House of Daniel, they used a conjure man to improve their playing. However, players from the House spotted the conjure man, and their manager, Harv Watrous, cited verses from the Book of Daniel to neutralize him, first by giving the conjure man diarrhea, and then finally rendering him unconscious. The House won, 9-4. When the Metros' manager grudgingly congratulated them, Watrous commented on the presence of the conjure man.[23]

Amarillo GraysEdit

The Amarillo Grays had been the premiere semipro team of Amarillo before the Metros. They were brawlers on the field, and engaged in animal cruelty to celebrate afterwards.[24]

Amarillo SandysEdit

The Amarillo Sandys was a Negro semi-pro team that played in Amarillo. Like the Metros, they weren't better than other teams in their league, but still pretty good.[25]

Artesia DrillersEdit

The Drillers were the semipro team of Artesia, New Mexico. Their name came from Artesia's status as an oil-town. The Drillers played in Brainard Park, which was built in such a way that home runs were frequent, and the Drillers made the most of that advantage. They beat the House of Daniel in May, 1934, thanks in part to the park's configuration, although the House did not play its best.[26]

Bakersfield Coca-ColasEdit

The Coca-Colas were a semipro team for the Coca-Cola bottling operation in Bakersfield, California. The House of Daniel played the Coca-Colas on August 8, 1934, beating them 11-2.[27]

Literary noteEdit

While there was Coca-Cola semipro team in Bakersfield in the 1920s, Turtledove's version seems to mix and match history, making his version more fictional than historical.

Bellingham ChinooksEdit

The Chinooks were the semipro team for Bellingham, Washington. The Chinooks played the House of Daniel on July 14, 1934. The weather was cool and overcast, but people came to watch. One of these Chinook fans, Clayton Spivey proved to be quite verbally abusive to the House, towards an outfielder named "Snake" in particular

However, after the House beat the Chinooks, 6-4, Snake chased down Clayton Spivey, finally recognizing him as his father, who'd had no idea that the "Snake" Spivey he was heckling was his own son, Jack.[28]

Big Spring CowboysEdit

The Cowboys were the semipro team for Big Spring, Texas. Like a number of teams in Texas, the Cowboys had been part of a professional league before the Big Bubble burst. The House of Daniel played the Cowboys second in a two game day; the House played the Sweetwater Swatters in the morning. The House and the Cowboys were scheduled to play the day before, but rains in Lubbock made that impossible.[29]

While the Cowboys had a good young pitcher, the House won 15-11.[30]

Billings BuffaloesEdit

The Billings Buffaloes were one of several teams to play in the Denver Post semipro tournament in June, 1934. They immediately disliked the Cheyenne Buffaloes; the feeling was mutual.[31]

Bohemian BrewersEdit

The Bohemian Brewers were one of several semipro teams that played in Spokane, Washington.[32] Their manager was Sad Slim Smith.[33] They were the second team the House of Daniel played in Spokane in July, 1934. The House beat them, 9-3. During a picnic after the game, House outfielder Jack Spivey asked Sad Slim Smith why Spokane didn't have a pro team. Smith explained that the minors refused to play in Nat Park because it was too run down.[34]

Boise BroncosEdit

The Broncos were one of two or three semipro teams in Boise, Idaho. The House of Daniel played the Broncos in July, 1934. Despite having a veteran pitcher, the Broncos made too many errors. The final score was 16-4, for the House. House manager Harv Watrous, always gracious in victory and defeat, assured the Broncos' manager that the House had been similarly clobbered in Twin Falls the day before.[35]

Boise SenatorsEdit

The Senators were one of two or three semipro teams in Boise, Idaho. They had been part of the failed Utah-Idaho League before it went under.[36]

Booth-Kelly AxemenEdit

The Booth-Kelly Axemen were a semipro team for a logging company in Springfield, Oregon. On July 29, 1934, the Axemen played the House of Daniel. The House probably lost--outfielder Jack Spivey couldn't remember a few years after the fact. He also remembered that people from Springfield's neighbor and rival Eugene came to cheer for the House of Daniel against the Axemen.[37]

Brigham City PeachesEdit

The Peaches were the semipro team of Brigham City, Utah. They took their name from the city's peach orchards. Their pitcher, Heber Orson Woodruff, was quite talented. He was a big part of the reason why the Peaches beat the House of Daniel on July, 1934. When House manager Harv Watrous asked Woodruff why he wasn't playing the pros, Woodruff responded, with standard Mormon politesse, that he was happy where he was.[38]

Canon City FylfotsEdit

The Fylfots were the semipro team for Cañon City, Colorado. They'd been a pro team in the minor Rocky Mountain League, until they team moved to Raton, New Mexico. The semipro team maintained the name even after a noisy fellow on the far side of ocean also adopted the fylfot as his symbol.[39]

The Fylfots played the House of Daniel in 1934. Unfortunately for the Fylfots, the House had just signed on renowned Negro League pitcher Carpetbag Booker for a few games. He made his House debut against the Fylfots. While the Fylfots lost dramatically, about half the team got Booker's autograph after the game.[40]

Literary commentEdit

The Fylfots are analogous to the real Canon City Swastikas, a team that played briefly in 1912 before moving to Raton, New Mexico.

Carlsbad PotashersEdit

The Potashers were a semipro team in Carlsbad, New Mexico. They were named for Carlsbad's primary industry.[41]

The House of Daniel played the Potashers in May, 1934. After several extra innings, House outfielder Jack Spivey was able to hit the ball towards third, disrupting the Potasher's strategy, and getting a run. The House won, 4-3.[42]

Chancelor Canfield/Midway OilEdit

The Chancelor Canfield/Midway Oil were a company semipro team in Long Beach, California. The House of Daniel played the Chancelors on August 10, 1934. It was a rough game from the start: the Chancelors' pitcher hit Azariah Summers in the ribs with the second pitch of the game. In response, Summers spiked their second baseman. In the sixth, the Chancelor's second baseman body blocked Eddie Lelivelt, and then kicked him while he was down. Lelivelt, promptly punched him, and a brawl broke out. House pitcher Wes Petersen suckerpunched another Chancerlor in the fighting. Once things were brought back under control, Lelivelt and his opponent were ejected Later, when the Chancelor's pitcher tried to hit Jack Spivey in the head, Spivey bunted, then body blocked their pitcher as he tried to catch the ball. When the pitcher charged Spivey, another brawl broke out, Spivey and the pitcher were ejected, and the House won, 9-1.[43]

Cheyenne BuffaloesEdit

The Cheyenne Buffaloes were one of several teams to play in the Denver Post semipro tournament in June, 1934. One of their key weapons was a lefty pitcher, a blonde nicknamed Whitey.[44]

They immediately disliked the Billings Buffaloes; the feeling was mutual.[45]

The Buffaloes made it far into the tournament, eliminating the Kansas City Regents on the third day of play, 5-2.[46] They played the House of Daniel on the fifth day in the semi-finals. Despite a hard game, the House won thanks to the skills of Carpetbag Booker.[47]

Clovis PioneersEdit

The Pioneers were the semipro team in Clovis, New Mexico. The House of Daniel played the Pioneers in May, 1934, winning 8-2. The Pioneers' fans were particularly abusive to the Pioneers when they lost. Conversely, the Pioneers were very good sports. Their shortstop owned a local barbecue restaurant and served the House for free; soon their catcher played guitar and sang.[48]

Colorado Springs All StarsEdit

The Colorado Springs All Stars weren't a semipro team specifically, but rather, a collection of what were allegedly the best players of Colorado Springs' local semipro league, a league owned by a former player with the defunct Colorado Springs Millionaires. The All Stars played the House of Daniel in 1934, and quickly proved they weren't the best team Colorado Springs could have fielded. After the All Stars made a number of sloppy mistakes, the House won 9-4.[49]

The next day, the All Stars' mananger learned that the House had signed Carpetbag Booker as pitcher for a stint. He wired Harv Watrous in Canon City, and asked the House to come back and play the All Stars a second time, assuring Watrous that there would be a full house if Booker started. Booker agreed, though Watrous told him to stop if he got sore or tired, since the Denver tournament was the most important thing.[50]

The All Stars' manager advertised the game, emphasizing Booker's role as part of the House. He also charged one dollar per person, which people paid.[51] The All Stars did better than the last game, but that still wasn't enough against Booker. Even after Watrous took Booker out in the sixth inning, the House won again. Still, the manager was pleased that the All Stars looked like a real team this time.[52]

Colorado Springs MillionairesEdit

The Millionaires were a defunct pro team that had been active in the early 20th century. After they folded, one player stayed in Colorado Springs, and put together a city league of semipro teams. In May, he assembled a team of his best players into the Colorado Springs All Stars, and played them against the House of Daniel. The House won, 9-4.[53]

Literary CommentEdit

While there was a real team called the Colorado Springs Millionaires, they have little in common with the fictional team.

Denver Half-SolesEdit

The Half-Soles were a semipro team in Denver. They were sponsored by a rubber company that made half-soles. They were one of two teams from Colorado to play in the Denver Post semipro tournament.[54] They played the Kansas City Regents in the second game of the tournament, and lost handily, 11-4. The crowd still loudly cheered on the Half-Soles and yelled racist comments at the Regents. Jack Spivey noted that the Half-Soles didn't belong on the field with the Regents, and were only there because they were from Denver and they were white.[55]

Literary commentEdit

The Denver Half-Soles appear to be partially based on the Gates Half-Soles, a team that played on behalf of Gates Rubber in Denver.

El Paso TexansEdit

The Texans were a semipro team in El Paso. They had been part of the Arizona-Texas pro league until the Big Bubble popped. After that league folded, the team became semi-pro, again. However, the Texans still played in Dudley Field, which was still a nice ballyard.[56]

The House of Daniel played the Texans in May, 1934. After a Texan bowled over House of Daniel player Eddie Lelivelt at second, the House's pitcher, Fidgety Frank Carlisle, hit one of their batters in the ribs with a fast ball. Rather than call it even, the Texans escalated. Later, when Jack Spivey slid into second base, hitting their baseman, the Texan hit Spivey in the ear. Spivey hit back, and a melee broke out. When the umpires got things under control, they threw Spivey and the Texan second baseman out of the game. The House beat the Texans 12-2.[57]

Enid EaglesEdit

The Enid Eagles were the semipro team of Enid, Oklahoma. Their manager was Rod Graver. Jack Spivey was able to earn some money playing at center for the team.[58] It was the fact that the Eagles were playing the Ponca City Greasemen in Ponca City that prompted Enid's major crime boss, Big Stu Kesselring, to hire Spivey to strong arm Mich Carstairs, who lived in Ponca City.[59]

The Eagles won the game, 5-3, with Spivey making some crucial catches.[60] The next morning, Spivey opted to stay in Ponca City.[61]

Fort Stockton PanthersEdit

The Panthers were the semipro team for Fort Stockton, Texas. Unlike some of the other semipro teams in the state, the Panthers had players of Mexican descent in their ranks.

In May, 1934, the House of Daniel beat the Panthers, 8-6, in a close game.[62]

Fresno AcornsEdit

The Acorns were a semipro team in Fresno, California. Because the minor league Oakland Oaks actually practiced in Fresno, the Acorns had to become the best semipro team in town.[63]

The House of Daniel played the Acorns on August 5, 1934 on an incredibly hot day. The House won, 4-3, but in later years all Jack Spivey would remember were the heat and the win.[64]

Gardena GaloshesEdit

The Galoshes were a semipro team from Gardena, a company team for a galoshes manufacturer. Jack Spivey joined them in 1935, after he'd left the House of Daniel. They were not a good team--he was second hitter. But they did give him an in at the factory, allowing him to leave the construction job he was not really cut out for.[65]

Grand Junction FalconsEdit

The Falcons were the semipro team for Grand Junction, Colorado.[66]

The House of Daniel had been scheduled to play the Falcons two days after the end of the Denver Post semipro tournament in June, 1934. However, the outbreak of the Great Zombie Riots of 1934 meant that they didn't play until four days after the tournament.[67] House manager Harv Watrous was able to get the game postponed. When the House did arrive, they were ballyhooed for having both won the semipro tournament and for having survived the riots.[68] The House beat the Falcons, 7-1. The Falcons were good sports though, and wanted hear about the tournament and the riots, so both teams went to dinner.[69]

Greeley GraysEdit

The Grays were the semipro team for Greeley, Colorado. Their roster was made up primarily of Mexican migrant workers for the local sugar beet industry. In June, 1934, the day after winning the Denver Post semipro tournament and surviving the Great Zombie Riots of 1934, the House of Daniel played the Grays. The Grays were good, and the House was very tired, so the Grays won handily.[70]

Thanks to the ongoing riots in Denver and the snows on Milner Pass, the House could not go to Grand Junction. Their manager, Harv Watrous, arranged for the House play the Grays twice more over the next two days. The teams won a game each.[71]

Hobbs BoostersEdit

The Boosters were the semipro team from Hobbs, New Mexico. The House of Daniel played them in May, 1934, winning 12-8. The game started out cordial, but as the House's lead grew, the Boosters opted to play rough, until House pitcher Wes Petersen hit the Boosters' clean-up man in his right knee. Neither team congratulated each other after the game was over. House manager Harv Watrous was unimpressed with the crowd size, and while everyone got paid their usual amount, he seemed unlikely to bring the team back to Hobbs.[72]

The Blue Sox played in the Denver Post Semipro Tournament in June.[73]

Idaho Falls SpudsEdit

The Spuds were the semipro team for Idaho Falls. Like many semipro teams, the Spuds had been pro at one time. The Spuds played the House of Daniel in a rain storm in July, 1934. Since the House had another game in Twin Falls the next day, the game was not called on account of rain. Moreover, the Spuds learned of the "balk" rule when their pitcher, angry that House batter Harv Watrous had hit a single, squeezed the wet ball so hard, it wiggled out of his hand. When the Spuds tried to contest it, the ump brought out a rule book. The House won, 6-5.[74]

Inland Motor FreightEdit

Inland Motor Freight (IMF) was one of several semipro teams that played in Spokane, Washington.[75] They were the third team the House of Daniel played in Spokane in July, 1934. IMF beat the House, 7-4, crushing Harv Watrous's dream of sweeping Spokane.[76]

Kimball Gun StoreEdit

Kimball Gun Store were a company team in Tacoma's local semipro league.[77] They beat the House of Daniel on July 17, 1934, preventing the House from a three-game sweep of the Tacoma league.[78]

Klamath Falls PelicansEdit

The Pelicans were the semipro team for Klamath Falls, Oregon. They beat the House of Daniel, 4-3, on July 30, 1934.[79]

La Mesa Town TeamEdit

The La Mesa Town Team was the semipro team for La Mesa, New Mexico. They were actually barnstormers in the so-called "Old Pro League", and traveled all over New Mexico, Arizona, Texas, and even into Mexico. The teams of the Old Pro League were known to be brawlers.[80]

The House of Daniel played the Town Team in May, 1934. The Town Team played hard, but didn't try to start a beanball war. The House of Daniel won, 9-7. Afterward, the Town Team's manager practically begged Harv Watrous to beat the Las Cruces Blue Sox the next day. Both teams had supper together after the game, which mostly consisted of chili and beer.[81]

Las Cruces Blue SoxEdit

The Blue Sox was the semipro team for La Mesa, New Mexico. They were in the so-called "Old Pro League", and known to be brawlers.[82] The Blue Sox were integrated, with one black player named Willard in centerfield.[83]

The House of Daniel played the Blue Sox in May, 1934. The House's newest player, Jack Spivey of Oklahoma, was initially hostile to the idea of playing against a colored player, and he couldn't resist making a few snide racist at Willard. Willard gave as good as he got, however. Moreover, the Blue Sox pitcher, Johnny hit Spivey in the ribs when he was up at bat. In the end, the House won.[84] Willard offered to fight Spivey after the game. While Spivey didn't want to back down, he also realized that he probably couldn't win, and so indicated he didn't have a quarrel with Willard now that the game was over. Willard let it go.[85]

The Blue Sox were one of the sixteen teams to play at the Denver Post semipro tournament. They were randomly assigned as visitors in the first game, and they played against the House.[86] When Willard saw that the House had Carpetbag Booker with them, he asked Jack Spivey if he called Booker a tarbaby. Spivey responded that since Booker was on his side, he had not. Willard accepted that answer.[87]

The Sox lost to the House, and were eliminated from the tournament.[88]

Las Vegas MaroonsEdit

The Maroons were the semipro team of Las Vegas, New Mexico. They shared a rivalry with the Madrid Miners. The House of Daniel beat the Miners the day before they played the Maroons. The Maroons greeted the House with chocolates and cigarettes to congratulate them for beating a hated rival. The House beat the Maroons, too, 6-2.[89]

Lewiston IndiansEdit

The Indians were the semipro team for Lewiston, Idaho. The team had a number of Nez Perce in the roster. By July, 1934, they had a reputation as a terrific team. They were going to join the Washington-Idaho League the following year, and had played the excellent Seattle Indians on several occasions (leading the situation wherein the Indians either won or lost all the time). They even played the visiting Tokyo Titans, a professional Japanese team.[90]

Still, the House of Daniel was able to beat the Indians, 6-1, when they played on July 8, 1934.[91]

Logan CollegiansEdit

The Collegians were the semipro team of Logan, Utah. They'd been a pro team in the Utah-Idaho League, and continued playing semipro after the league folded.[92]

The House of Daniel played the Collegians in June, 1934, the day after the House played a rough game against the Ogden Gunners. The Collegians' manager approached House manager Harv Watrous just before the game and assured him that the Collegians wouldn't play the game the Gunners had.[93]

This turned out to be true. The crowd was even polite to the House. In the end, the House won, 6-4.[94]

Lubbock Black HubbersEdit

The Lubbock Black Hubbers was a Negro semipro team. They were affiliated with the white Hubbers. The white team provided the black team with cast-off equipment and uniforms. Members of the Black Hubbers watched the white Hubbers play the House of Daniel.[95]

Lubbock HubbersEdit

The Hubbers were the semipro team for Lubbock, Texas. They'd been in the West Texas League before the Big Bubble popped, and managed to keep some of their pro players afterward. They also had a colored affiliate team, the Black Hubbers.[96]

The Hubbers played the House of Daniel in May, 1934. Their pitcher, a rotund fellow, proved to have an unpredictable knuckle-ball. The House of Daniel won, but only after a bunt and sacrifice run. The final score was 1-0.[97]

Marfa IndiansEdit

The Indians were the semipro team of Marfa, Texas. The House of Daniel played the Indians in May, 1934. The Indians reminded Jack Spivey more of cowboys: the were lean and tan, and some even had hair that had been bleached by the sun.[98]

Their secret weapon was a pitcher named Pablo. Thanks to his incredible pitching, the Indians beat the House, 3-1.[99]

Mason City BeaversEdit

The Beavers were the semipro team of Mason City, Washington. They played in the Idaho-Washington League. Despite Mason City's small population, they were crazy about baseball in general, and loved the Beavers. For that matter, nearby Coulee City also loved the Beavers.[100]

The House of Daniel played the Beavers in July. The House won, 8-2, but the Beavers and their fans proved to be hospitable and gracious in defeat.[101]

McNulty TransferEdit

McNulty Transfer were a company team in Tacoma's local semipro league. They had a former professional player named Vic, who could still hit, but had a bad knee and couldn't run anymore.[102]

The House of Daniel played the McNulty Transfer on July 15, 1934, beating them, 6-3.[103]

Medford NuggetsEdit

The Nuggets were the semipro team of Medford, Oregon. On July 29, 1934, in a hard game, the House of Daniel was able to beat the Nuggets. Things got heated in the ninth inning, with the House having a 2-1 lead. The Nuggets doubled with one out. Using the hidden-ball trick, House second baseman Eddie Lelivelt tagged out player named Olaf with a lead off of second base. When he learned he was out, the Nugget tried to hit Lelivelt, leading to both teams to fight on the field. When it was broken up, Olaf was ejected from the game, and the House of Daniel won.[104]

Odessa CoyotesEdit

The Coyotes were the semipro team in Odessa, Texas. Northerners called them the "Kye-oh-tees". Locals called them "Kye-oats". The House of Daniel played the Coyotes in Odessa city park; House of Daniel manager Harv Watrous was not happy, as there were fewer paying customers. He resolved that next year, the team would play in Midland, which had a ball field.[105]

Moreover, the Coyotes beat the House, 7-2. The Coyotes' manager was gracious in victory, noting that the House had been on the road quite a bit in the last couple of days. Harv Watrous acknowledged this was true, but instead said that the Coyotes had several good players.[106]

Ogden GunnersEdit

The Gunners were the semipro team of Ogden, Utah. They had been part of the Utah-Idaho League until it folded, and they continued to stick together. In late June, 1934, they played the House of Daniel in a rough game in which members of both teams were hurt. The Gunners won, 7-5. Unlike other teams in Utah, the Gunners did not dine with the House after the game.[107]

Olympia TimbermenEdit

The Timbermen were one of several teams to play in the Denver Post semipro tournament in June, 1934.[108]

Onion OilEdit

The Onion Oil semipro team played the House of Daniel in Long Beach in early 1935. Like a number of teams in the area, the Onions had some old pros in their roster. The House beat them either 5-3, 5-4. As it happened, this was the last game Jack Spivey played with the House.[109]

Pampa All StarsEdit

The Pampa All Stars were one of three semipro teams in Pampa, Texas.[110] The first game Jack Spivey played with the House of Daniel was in Pampa against the All Stars.[111]

Pampa OilersEdit

The Pampa Oilers were one of three semipro teams in Pampa, Texas. Their name derived from the oil operation in the town.[112]

Pampa PlainsmenEdit

The Pampa Plainsmen were one of three semipro teams in Pampa, Texas. Their name derived from the second most important part of Pampa's economy: cattle.[113]

Pecos PeccariesEdit

The House of Daniel played the Pecos Peccaries in May, 1934. Jack Spivey was disappointed that they weren't the "Pecos Bills"; Harv Watrous ignored Spivey's attempt at a joke by explaining that another team had that name, but that the Peccaries were better, and had agreed to giving the House a bigger share of the money collected.[114]

The Peccaries were good sports, playing clean even after the House pulled ahead and won 11-3. In fact, the Peccaries were quite excited to be playing the House; one player got the autographs of the entire House. After the game, the Peccaries congratulated Harv Watrous by saying that the House had "Pecosed" the Peccaries. The manager went on to explain that "Pecosing" was a method of disposing of the body of a murder victim by filling the corpse full of rocks and throwing it in the river. Watrous was glad to hear that the Peccaries weren't going to "Pecos" the House of Daniel.[115]

Pendleton BuckaroosEdit

The Buckaroos were the semipro team of Pendleton, Oregon. The House of Daniel played and beat them on July 23, 1934. The people in Pendleton cared more about their rodeo than they did about baseball.[116]

Pocatello BannocksEdit

The Bannocks were a semipro team in Pocatello, Idaho. They'd been a minor league pro team for a time. In 1934, they were part of the semipro "Twilight League". On July 4, 1934, the Bannocks played the House of Daniel. The House was still smarting over their loss to the Brigham City Peaches the day before, and took it out on the Bannocks, beating them thoroughly 13-4.[117]

Jack Spivey never did learn what a "Bannock" was.

Ponca City GreasemenEdit

The Ponca City Greasemen were the semipro team of Ponca City. They got their name from Ponca City's sizable oil industry.[118] As the Enid Eagles were playing the Greasemen Ponca City in May, 1934, Enid's major crime boss, Big Stu Kesselring, decided to hire Jack Spivey, the Eagles' center, to strong arm Mich Carstairs, who lived in Ponca City.[119]

The Greasemen lost the game, 5-3.[120] The next day, the Greasemen played the barnstorming House of Daniel. While it proved to be a brutal game, with two members of the House being seriously injured, the House of Daniel won 8-6.[121]

Provo TimpsEdit

The Timps were the semipro team for Provo, Utah. They played in Timpanagos Park. In late June, 1934, they played the House of Daniel in a sell-out game. Despite their talented roster, the Timps lost to the House. Being good sports, the Timps took the House out to dinner after the game. During the course of the game, members of the House discussed the Mormon faith held by most of the Timps.[122]

Pueblo ChieftansEdit

The Chieftans were a semipro team in Pueblo, Colorado. Up until 1932, they had been part of the pro-class A Western League. They'd been dropped after eastern teams decided they were tired of traveling through Colorado. Despite this ignominy, the Chieftans retained a formidable roster of players who'd been close to the big leagues. In 1934, they even played in a new ball park, Runyon Field.[123]

The House of Daniel played and beat the Chieftans in 1934. This was an important game for the House, as they'd lost back-to-back games in Raton, New Mexico and Trinidad, Colorado.[124]

Literary commentEdit

The Chieftans are broadly similar to the OTL Pueblo Braves, who had been in the Western League until being dropped in 1933.

Rapid City RunnersEdit

The Rapid City Runners were one of several teams to play in the Denver Post semipro tournament in June, 1934.[125]

Raton MiceEdit

The Mice were the semipro team of Raton, New Mexico. Their name was redundant, as "raton" is the Spanish word for "mouse". The team was a reflection of the demographics of Raton proper, with substantial number of white and Mexican-American players, and two black players. One of the latter was their first baseman, Luke, a large, muscular man who could hit with power.[126] Thanks to Luke, the Mice beat the House of Daniel, 7-4.[127]

Red Bluff StagsEdit

The Stags were the semipro team of Red Bluff, California. They had a rivalry with the Tigers from nearby Redding. When the House of Daniel beat the Tigers on July 30, 1934, their manager made Harv Watrous of the House promise to beat the Stags the next day. (Jack Spivey didn't record who won that game, however.)[128]

Redding TigersEdit

The Tigers were Redding, California's semipro team. The Tigers were well know along the West Coast. Redding invested in Tigers Park, insuring it was well maintained.[129]

The House of Daniel played the Tigers on July 30, beating them 7-5.[130]

Redondo Beach Sand DabsEdit

Despite their name, the semipro Redondo Beach Sand Dabs played in Gardena. They were mostly fisherman. They played the House of Daniel on August 13, 1934, losing 11-3.[131]

Reno GamblersEdit

The Reno Gamblers were one of several teams to play in the Denver Post semipro tournament in June, 1934.[132]

Roswell GiantsEdit

The Giants were a semipro team in Roswell, New Mexico. They had been a pro-team circa 1924, but the league folded, and they were semi-pro from then on.[133]. The House of Daniel played the Giants in May, 1934, won 8-5.[134].

Salt Lake City IndustriesEdit

The Industries were a semipro team from Salt Lake City. They were one of several teams to play in the Denver Post semipro tournament in June, 1934.[135] The Industries made it to the semi-finals, finally losing to the Pittsburgh Crawdads.[136]

About a week later, the House of Daniel, the final winners of the tournament, played the Industries in Salt Lake City, beating them 13-11.[137]

San Diego All StarsEdit

On August 23, 1934, the House of Daniel traveled to San Diego to play an all star team in Balboa Stadium, right next to the zoo.[138] One of their players was sixteen year old who could hit, even though he was as skinny as a splinter. He was also a loud mouth. Even though Wes Petersen of the House hit him in the ribs, the All-Stars won, 5-3.[139]

San Diego SailorsEdit

The Sailors were a semipro team from San Diego. They were one of the several teams that played in the Denver Post semipro tournament in June, 1934.[140] The Sailors made it to the third day of the tournament, when they were eliminated by the House of Daniel in a 4-1 night game.[141]

Santa Fe SaintsEdit

The Saints were Santa Fe's semipro team in May, 1934. They played the House of Daniel that month. While the House had some initial problems with the climate, they started making runs in short order. When they led 15-4, the Saints' third pitcher threw at Harv Watrous' ear when he was at bat. Watrous ducked. When that pitcher was up at bat in the next inning, House pitcher Wes Petersen hit his ankle bone; the ball made an audible clunk. That put an end to the roughness from then on, and the House won.[142]

Shell OilersEdit

The Oilers were a semipro company team for Shell Oil in Long Beach, California. They beat the House of Daniel on August 9, 1934, 12-5.[143]

Silver Loaf BakersEdit

The Silver Loaf Bakers were one of several semipro teams who played in Spokane, Washington. They were the first of three Spokane teams the House of Daniel played in July 1934. The House beat the Bakers, 5-2. When it was over there were as many people cheering the House of Daniel as there were cheering the Bakers.[144]

Strawberry Park PickersEdit

The Strawberry Park Pickers were a semipro team in Gardena, California. Their roster was Japanese-American. The House of Daniel played the Pickers on August 12, 1934. House outfielder Jack Spivey noticed that the Japanese fans were all cheering exclusively for the Pickers, whereas white fans were split between people cheering the hometown team and people cheering for the House because they were also white. The House won, 6-2. The Pickers were happy to have played the House, and plainly had a fun game.[145]

Superior DairyEdit

Superior Dairy were a company team in Tacoma's local semipro league.[146] The House of Daniel trounced the Superior Dairy on July 16, 1934.[147]

Sweetwater SwattersEdit

The Swatters were a semipro team in Sweetwater, Texas. They'd been part of the pros prior to the Big Bubble popping.[148] The House of Daniel played the Swatters in a morning game after losing two days travel time to torrential rains. The House won, 8-3.[149]

The Dalles all-starsEdit

On July 24, 1934, an "all-star" team from The Dalles played the House of Daniel. It was not a very good team. House baseman Eddie Lelivelt even pulled the hidden-ball trick on a runner.[150]

Torrance ColumbiasEdit

The Columbias were a semipro team in Torrance, California. The House of Daniel played them on August 11, 934. It was a polite and congenial game compared with the one the House played against the Chancelor Canfield/Midway Oil team the day before. The House won, and the Columbias' manager congratulated the House for pushing back against the Chancelors.[151]

Trinidad VampiresEdit

The Vampires were the semipro team for Trinidad, Colorado. Despite their name, they did not field any real vampires. They beat the House of Daniel, 3-2, the second losing game in a row for the House.[152]

Literary commentEdit

There was a real team called the Trinidad Vampires, established in the 1880s. However, it appears to have gone defunct long before 1934.

Tulia RavensEdit

The Tulia Ravens were the semipro team of tiny Tulia, Texas. Despite their name, their uniforms were green. They'd mixed it up with the Amarillo Grays in the past. The Ravens beat the House of Daniel in May, 1934, the first Texas team to do so in three games. Much of their victory was credited to their pitcher, Sidd. Even the House of Daniel's manager, Harv Watrous, congratulated him and hoped that he had a future in the majors.[153]

Twin Falls CowboysEdit

The Cowboys were the semipro team for Twin Falls, Idaho. On a drizzly day in July, 1934, the Cowboys played the House of Daniel. The Cowboys played in a park by a canal that brought wastewater down from a mine. Thus, they had a skin infield and outfield. Both teams used utensils to dig off the mud and other filth that accumulated on their cleats. Despite the best efforts of Fidgety Frank and Azariah Summers, the House lost, 13-7.[154]

During the game, Fidgety Frank wondered if he should pack it in; he'd been so bad, Watrous took him out after the fifth inning. Watrous assured him he still had plenty of games left.[155]

Literary commentEdit

The semipro Cowboys share a name with a minor league team established in 1939. They do not appear to be intended to be the same team.

Waco WildcatsEdit

The Waco Wildcats were one of several teams to play in the Denver Post semipro tournament in June, 1934. When they arrived at the Denver Post office the day before the tournament, they spent a fair amount of time glaring at the Negro teams present.[156]

The Wildcats played the Pittsburgh Crawdads in the sixth game of the tournament, losing spectacularly, 12-1. When they saw they were losing, the Wildcats started throwing at the Crawdads, and making hard slides. The game didn't quite become a brawl, though.[157]

Walla Walla BearsEdit

The House of Daniel played the Walla Walla Bears on July 22, 1934. By this stage of the tour of Washington, towns and games began to blur for House outfielder Jack Spivey. However, years later he remembered Walla Walla and the Bears because the Bears' manager was named Cliff Ditto.[158]

Wenatchee ChiefsEdit

The Chiefs were the semipro team for Wenatchee, Washington. The House of Daniel played the Chiefs on July 13, 1934, beating them 9-7.[159]

Yakima IndiansEdit

The Indians were the semipro team for Yakima, Washington. They had been pros in the 1920s.[160]

The House of Daniel played the Indians on July 18, 1934.[161] The Indians attempted to use a Yakima man named Ralph to use a Spilyay (coyote) dance to secure a win, but Harv Watrous was able to stop him by quoting from the Book of Daniel. The House won, 7-5. The Indians' manager claimed that Ralph had done it on his own, but the no one in the House believed him. For his part, Spivey found the fact that the Yakima of Washington shared many of the same beliefs about coyote that the local Indians in Oklahoma did.[162]

ReferencesEdit

  1. The House of Daniel, 6078.
  2. The House of Daniel, loc. 3574, ebook.
  3. Ibid., loc. 3755-3765.
  4. Ibid., loc. 3776.
  5. Ibid., loc. 6078-6086.
  6. Ibid. pg. 37.
  7. Ibid, loc. 3109.
  8. Ibid., loc. 2847.
  9. Ibid., loc. 3829.
  10. Ibid., loc. 2816-2870.
  11. Ibid., loc. 3574.
  12. Ibid., loc. 3765-3776.
  13. Ibid., loc. 3807-3818.
  14. Ibid, pg. 37.
  15. Ibid., loc. 6078.
  16. Ibid., loc. 4872.
  17. Ibid., loc. 2290-2300.
  18. Ibid., loc. 2300-2310.
  19. 'Ibid., loc. 1788.
  20. Ibid., loc. 1809-1858.
  21. Ibid., loc. 1083.
  22. Ibid, loc. 1105.
  23. Ibid, loc. 1149-1204.
  24. Ibid., loc 1127-1138.
  25. Ibid., loc. 1116.
  26. Ibid., loc. 2333-2364.
  27. Ibid., loc. 5690.
  28. Ibid., loc. 5062-5095.
  29. Ibid., loc., 1374-1517.
  30. Ibid., loc. 1527.
  31. Ibid., loc. 3647, ebook.
  32. Ibid., loc. 4921.
  33. Ibid., loc. 4956.
  34. Ibid, loc, 4956-4973.
  35. Ibid., loc. 4803-4846.
  36. Ibid., loc. 4803.
  37. Ibid., p. 289, HC; loc. 5479, ebook.
  38. Ibid., loc. loc. 4618-4626.
  39. Ibid., loc. 3478.
  40. Ibid., loc. 3478-3499.
  41. Ibid., loc. 2602.
  42. Ibid, loc. 2613-2658.
  43. Ibid., loc. 5798-5815.
  44. Ibid., loc. 3796.
  45. loc. 3647, ebook.
  46. Ibid., loc. 3776.
  47. Ibid., loc. 3796-3807.
  48. Ibid., loc. 3066-3153.
  49. Ibid, loc. 3391-3413.
  50. Ibid., loc. 3509-3520.
  51. Ibid., loc. 3532.
  52. Ibid., loc. 3532-3542.
  53. Ibid, loc. 3391-3413.
  54. Ibid., loc. 3647.
  55. Ibid., loc. 3755-3765.
  56. Ibid, loc. 2020, ebook.
  57. Ibid., loc. 2020-2051.
  58. Ibid., pg. 4, ebook.
  59. Ibid., pgs. 5-7.
  60. Ibid., Loc. 369-423.
  61. Ibid., loc. 553-606.
  62. Ibid., loc. 1725-1799
  63. Ibid., loc. 5664, ebook.
  64. Ibid., loc. 5672.
  65. Ibid., loc. 6278.
  66. Ibid., loc. 4302.
  67. Ibid., loc. 4124-4240.
  68. Ibid., loc. 4302.
  69. Ibid., loc. 4311-4354.
  70. Ibid., 4200-4210.
  71. Ibid., loc. 4124-4240.
  72. Ibid., loc. 2421-2517.
  73. Ibid., loc.3647.
  74. Ibid., loc. 4708-4743, ebook.
  75. Ibid., loc. 4921.
  76. Ibid., loc. 4973-4982.
  77. Ibid., loc. 5228-5265.
  78. Ibid., loc. 5265.
  79. Ibid., loc 5563-5591.
  80. Ibid., loc. 2114.
  81. Ibid., loc. 2114-2124.
  82. Ibid., loc. 2114.
  83. Ibid., loc 2156-2201, ebook.
  84. Ibid., loc. 2178-2245.
  85. Ibid., loc. 2268.
  86. Ibid., loc. 3636-3667.
  87. Ibid., loc. 3734.
  88. Ibid., loc. 3734-3745.
  89. Ibid. loc. 3015-3033.
  90. Ibid., loc. 4846-4883.
  91. Ibid, loc. 4901-4921.
  92. Ibid., loc. 4552.
  93. Ibid., loc. 4560.
  94. Ibid., loc. 4560-4609.
  95. Ibid., loc. 1285.
  96. Ibid., loc. 1275-1285.
  97. Ibid., loc., 1275-1363.
  98. Ibid., loc. 1904-1914.
  99. Ibid. loc 1914-1967.
  100. Ibid, loc. 4992-5010, ebook.
  101. Ibid., loc. 5018-5027.
  102. Ibid., loc. 5228-5246.
  103. Ibid., loc. 5246-5265.
  104. Ibid., loc. 5488-5523.
  105. Ibid, loc. 1559, ebook.
  106. Ibid., 1592.
  107. Ibid., loc. 4515-4531.
  108. loc. 3647, ebook.
  109. Ibid., loc. 6224.
  110. Ibid., loc. 998, ebook.
  111. Ibid.
  112. Ibid., loc. 998, ebook.
  113. Ibid., loc. 998, ebook.
  114. Ibid., loc. 1668.
  115. Ibid., loc. 1657-1713.
  116. Ibid., loc. 5404.
  117. Ibid., loc. 4664-4690.
  118. Ibid., pg. 3.
  119. Ibid., pgs. 5-7.
  120. Ibid., Loc. 369-423.
  121. Ibid, loc. 612-715.
  122. Ibid., loc. 4436-4508.
  123. Ibid., loc. 3359.
  124. Ibid., loc. 3369-3391.
  125. loc. 3647, ebook.
  126. Ibid. loc. 3255-3265.
  127. Ibid., loc. 3297.
  128. Ibid., loc. 5646, ebook.
  129. Ibid., loc. 5620, ebook.
  130. Ibid., loc. 5620-5646.
  131. Ibid. 6022-6050.
  132. loc. 3647, ebook.
  133. 'Iibid., p. 145-146, HC; loc 2669-2702, ebook.
  134. Ibid. p. 145-146, HC; loc 2669-2702.
  135. loc. 3647, ebook.
  136. Ibid., loc. 3807.
  137. Ibid. loc. 4409-4427.
  138. Ibid., loc. 6059.
  139. Ibid., loc. 6067-6078.
  140. Ibid., loc. 3647, ebook.
  141. Ibid., loc. 3786.
  142. Ibid., loc. 2870-2921.
  143. Ibid., loc. 5762-5780.
  144. Ibid., loc. 4947.
  145. Ibid., loc. 5852-5861.
  146. Ibid., loc. 5228-5265.
  147. Ibid., loc. 5265.
  148. Ibid., loc 1429-1440.
  149. Ibid. 1471.
  150. Ibid., loc. 5442-5470.
  151. The House of Daniel, loc. 5825-5834, ebook.
  152. Ibid., loc. 3308-3325.
  153. Ibid, loc. 1212-1253.
  154. Ibid., loc. 4743-4789.
  155. Ibid.
  156. loc. 3647, ebook.
  157. Ibid., loc. 3765-3776.
  158. Ibid., loc. 5404, ebook.
  159. Ibid. loc., 5035-5044.
  160. Ibid., loc. 5292.
  161. Ibid., loc. 5292-5338.
  162. Ibid., loc. 5284-5356.