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The following references to cultural and/or historical events or people in Supervolcano: Eruption occur during the novel.

Story OrderEdit

  • Page 1
    • Motel 6 - Motel 6 is a major chain of budget motels with more than 1,000 locations in the United States and Canada.
  • Page 2
    • ... flailing away against Randy Johnson in his prime. - Randall David "Randy" Johnson is a retired American professional baseball player. A left-handed pitcher, Johnson played in Major League Baseball for 22 seasons. Johnson is a member of the 300 win club.
  • Page 5
    • ... liked turning it up to eleven. - "Up to eleven" or "these go to eleven" is an idiom from popular culture, coined in the movie This Is Spinal Tap, which has come to refer to anything being exploited to its utmost abilities, or apparently exceeding them, such as a sound volume control.
  • Page 11
    • ... if the Jolly Green Giant dropped a tray from his freezer. - The Jolly Green Giant was introduced as the mascot of the then Minnesota Valley Canning Company (Green Giant Company since 1950) in 1928.
  • Page 17
    • Not the Black Hole of Calcutta ... - The Black Hole of Calcutta was a small dungeon in the old Fort William in Calcutta, India, where troops of the Nawab of Bengal, Siraj ud-Daulah, held British prisoners of war after the capture of the fort on 20 June 1756.
  • Page 17
    • ... but not the Ritz-Carlton, either. - The Ritz-Carlton Hotels is a chain of luxury hotels and operates 84 luxury hotels and resorts in major cities and resorts in 26 countries worldwide.
  • Page 25
    • National Geographic documentary. - The National Geographic Society, headquartered in Washington, DC in the United States, is one of the largest nonprofit scientific and educational institutions in the world.
  • Page 25
    • Ken Burns - Kenneth Lauren "Ken" Burns (born July 29, 1953) is an American director and producer of documentary films, known for his style of using archival footage and photographs.
  • Page 30
    • ... employees going postal. - Going postal, in American English slang, means becoming extremely and uncontrollably angry, often to the point of violence, and usually in a workplace environment.
  • Page 30
    • Jenny Craig frozen dinner - Jenny Craig, Inc., often known simply as Jenny Craig, is a weight loss, weight management, and nutrition company founded in 1983 by Jenny Craig and her husband, Sidney Craig.
  • Page 30
    • Harvey Wallbanger - The Harvey Wallbanger is a mixed drink made with vodka, Galliano, and orange juice.
  • Page 33
    • They Might Be Giants - They Might Be Giants is an American alternative rock band formed in 1982. The group is best known for an unconventional and experimental style of alternative music.
  • Page 35
    • Archie McPhee - Archie McPhee is a Seattle-based novelty dealer owned by Mark Pahlow. Begun in the 1970s in Los Angeles as the mail-order business Accoutrements, in 1983 it opened a retail outlet dubbed "Archie McPhee" after Pahlow's wife's great-uncle.
  • Page 41
    • the Hermitage - The State Hermitage is a museum of art and culture in St. Petersburg, Russia. One of the largest and oldest museums in the world, it was founded in 1764 by Catherine the Great and has been open to the public since 1852.
  • Page 49
    • "Addicted to Love" - "Addicted to Love" is a song by English rock singer Robert Palmer released in 1986.
  • Page 53
    • Clairol - Clairol is a personal-care-product division of Procter & Gamble begun in 1931. The company was widely recognized in its home country, the United States, for its "Miss Clairol" home hair-coloring kit introduced in 1956.
  • Page 55
    • Theocritus - Theocritus, the creator of Ancient Greek bucolic poetry, flourished in the 3rd century BC.
  • Page 57
    • ... when the Big One'll hit. - "The Big One" is a term often used in casual conversation by residents of California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia to describe the megathrust earthquake anticipated as inevitably striking the Cascadia Subduction Zone.
  • Page 59
    • gravedigger in Hamlet say? ... familiarity lending a quality of easiness - In Shakespeare's play Hamlet one gravedigger singing a humorous song while digging leads Horatio to explain "Custom hath made it in him a property of easiness."
  • Page 60
    Charlie Brown

    Charlie Brown

    • ... round as Charlie Brown's head. - Charlie Brown is the protagonist of the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. As drawn, he had a round head.
  • Page 63
    • Crank - Crank is slang for a low purity, crystallized Methamphetamine that is administered in a powder form.
  • Page 65
    • Balboa - Vasco de Balboa was a Spanish explorer best known for having crossed the Isthmus of Panama to the Pacific Ocean becoming the first European to lead an expedition to have seen or reached the Pacific from the New World.
  • Page 65
    • Keats would have got a C- in Western Civ - John Keats (1795 – 1821) was an English Romantic poet. In Keats' poem "On first looking into Chapman’s Homer" he mistakenly has Cortez spot the Pacific not Balboa.
  • Page 68
    • ... plowed through the chow like Sherman plowing through Georgia ... - William Sherman's Savannah Campaign during the American Civil War was a march from Atlanta and ended with the capture of the port of Savannah. Sherman's forces destroyed military targets as well as industry, infrastructure, and other civilian property during the march.
  • Page 71
    • Phi Beta Kappa - The Phi Beta Kappa Society is the oldest honor society for the liberal arts and sciences and aims to promote and advocate excellence in the field.
  • Page 73
    • When it was railroad time, it was railroad time ... - “When railroading time comes you can railroad—but not before.” from Robert A. Heinlein's The Door Into Summer. It is an observation that technological breakthroughs can't occur until the state of the art reaches a critical level. Once it does, there can be multiple inventors of a similar technology.
  • Page 74
    • Michael Jackson or Mariah Carey would have committed seppuku - Michael Joseph Jackson was an American singer-songwriter, actor, musician, dancer, businessman, and philanthropist. It is estimated that Jackson earned about $750 million in his lifetime. Mariah Carey is an American singer, songwriter, actress, record producer, and philanthropist. In 2000 Carey signed a $100 million recording contract with Virgin Records.
  • Page 76
    • Moose Drool - Moose Drool is a brown ale brewed by Big Sky Brewing Company located in Missoula, Montana.
  • Page 76
    • Guinness - Guinness is a popular Irish dry stout that originated in the brewery of Arthur Guinness (1725–1803) at St. James's Gate, Dublin.
  • Page 90
    • The Burning Bed - The Burning Bed is the name of both a non-fiction book by Faith McNulty about battered housewife Francine Hughes, and the TV-movie adaptation starred Farrah Fawcett as Hughes.
  • Page 93
    • Titanic - The RMS Titanic was a British Olympic class passenger liner that became famous for her collision with an iceberg on April 14, 1912 and her dramatic sinking on April 15, 1912.
  • Page 98
    • ... that song about tomorrow, tomorrow? - "Tomorrow" is a popular song from the musical Annie expressing the protagonists optimistic outlook.
  • Page 112
    • "maybe the horse will learn to sing." - Fable attributed to Herodotus, an ancient Greek historian.
  • Page 115
    • life, the universe and everything - In The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, a group of hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings demand to learn the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, The Universe, and Everything from the supercomputer, Deep Thought.
  • Page 121
    • So why don't we get drunk and screw? ... country song ... - "Why Don't We Get Drunk" is a novelty song written and performed by Jimmy Buffett. It was a b-side to "The Great Filling Station Holdup", released in 1973. The first line of the chorus was: "Why don't we get drunk an' screw?"
  • Page 122
    • Cowboy Bebop - Cowboy Bebop is a 1998 Japanese anime series developed by Sunrise. The twenty-six episodes ("sessions") of the series are set in the year 2071, and follow the adventures of a bounty hunter crew traveling on the Bebop (their spaceship).
  • Page 122
    • Bebop Deluxe - Be-Bop Deluxe were an English progressive rock band who achieved critical acclaim and moderate commercial success during the mid to late 1970s.
  • Page 123
    NewYorkerCover 1976-Mar29

    View of the World ...

    • ... the USA from New york City's viewpoint. - View of the World from 9th Avenue is a 1976 illustration by Saul Steinberg that served as the cover of the March 29, 1976, edition of The New Yorker. The work presents the view from Manhattan of the rest of the world showing Manhattan as the center of the world.
  • Page 123
    • Brillo fright wig - Brillo Pad is a trade name for a scouring pad, used for cleaning dishes, and made from steel wool impregnated with soap. A fright wig is a wig with hair that stands out from the head. Together, this implies curly hair standing out from the head.
  • Page 123
    • Dylan - Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American musician, singer-songwriter, artist, and writer. He has been an influential figure in popular music and culture for more than five decades.
  • Page 123
    • ... cover of the Rolling Stone - Rolling Stone is a magazine published every two weeks that focuses on politics and popular culture. It was founded in San Francisco, California in 1967.
  • Page 124
    • Robin Trower - Robin Leonard Trower (born 9 March 1945) is an English rock guitarist and vocalist who achieved success with Procol Harum during the 1960s, and then again as the bandleader of his own power trio.
  • Page 124
    • Hendrix - James Marshall "Jimi" Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American musician, singer, and songwriter. Although his mainstream career spanned only four years, he is widely regarded as one of the most influential electric guitarists in the history of popular music.
  • Page 124
    • a man's reach ... - "Ah, but a man's reach should exceed his grasp, / Or what's a heaven for?" are two lines from Robert Browning's 1855 poem "Andrea del Sarto".
  • Page 125
    • Carnegie Hall - Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States. Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music.
  • Page 126
    • Marshall stacks - Marshall Amplification is a British company that designs and manufactures music amplifiers, speaker cabinets, brands personal headphones/earphones (made by Zound Industries), and, having acquired Natal Drums, drums and bongos.
  • Page 131
    • Popeyes Chicken & Buscuits - Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen is an American chain of fried chicken fast food restaurants founded in 1972 in New Orleans, Louisiana. It is often referred to as Popeyes and sometimes as Popeyes Chicken & Biscuits or Popeyes Chicken & Seafood.
  • Page 136
    • With all the horseshit, he was bound to find a pony - Punch line to an old joke about an optimistic child digging into a pile of manure.
  • Page 137
    • Santa Anas - The Santa Ana winds are strong, extremely dry down-slope winds that originate inland and affect coastal Southern California. The winds are known especially for the hot dry weather (often the hottest of the year) that they bring in the fall, and are infamous for fanning regional wildfires.
  • Page 138
    • Brita filter - BRITA GmbH is a German company founded in 1966 by Heinz Hankammer with headquarters in Taunusstein, Hesse, Germany, that specializes in water filtration products.
  • Page 144
    • ... the end of the world as she knew it - the REM tune ... - R.E.M. was an American rock band from Athens, Georgia, formed in 1980 and amicably disbanded in September 2011. "It's the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)" is a song by R.E.M. which first appeared on their 1987 album Document.
  • Page 144
    • TS Eliot - Thomas Stearns "T. S." Eliot (1888 – 1965) was a playwright, literary critic, and an important English-language poet of the 20th century. "This is the way the world ends, not with a bang but a whimper.", alluded to by Kelly Birnbaum are the last two lines in the final stanza of Eliot's The Hollow Men.
  • Page 145
    • Goes to eleven, man ... This is Spinal Tap - See reference for Page 5 above. This Is Spinal Tap is an American 1984 rock music mockumentary about the fictional British heavy metal band Spinal Tap.
  • Page 146
    • Apocalypse Now - Apocalypse Now is a 1979 American epic war film set during the Vietnam War, directed and produced by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Martin Sheen, Marlon Brando, and Robert Duvall.
  • Page 146
    • I love the smell of hydrogen sulfide in the morning. Smells like tenure. - This is a parody of a famous quote from Apocalypse Now: "I love the smell of napalm in the morning ... Smelled like victory".
  • Page 149
    • ... parody of Kipling's "If" - "If—" is a poem by British Nobel laureate Rudyard Kipling, written in 1895 and first published in Rewards and Fairies, 1910. It is a tribute to Leander Starr Jameson, and is written in the form of paternal advice to the poet's son. As poetry, "If—" is a literary example of Victorian-era stoicism.
  • Page 151
    • ... louder than a Metallica concert. - Metallica is an American heavy metal band from Los Angeles, California. The band's fast tempos, instrumentals, and aggressive musicianship placed them as one of the founding "big four" of thrash metal.
  • Page 158
    • Energizer Bunny - The Energizer Bunny is the marketing icon and mascot of Energizer batteries in North America. It is a pink toy rabbit wearing sunglasses that beats a bass drum bearing the Energizer logo. The mascot is promoted as being able to continue operating indefinitely, or at least much longer than similar toys using rival brands' batteries. In North America the term "Energizer Bunny" has entered the vernacular as a term for anything that continues endlessly.
  • Page 179
    • Stinky Cheese Man - The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales is a postmodern children's book by Jon Scieszka. Published in 1992 by Viking, it is a collection of twisted, humorous parodies of famous children's stories and fairy tales, such as "Little Red Riding Hood", "The Ugly Duckling" and "The Gingerbread Man".
  • Page 183
    • BlackBerry - BlackBerry is a line of smartphones and services designed and marketed by BlackBerry Limited (formerly known as Research In Motion/RIM).
  • Page 187
    • ... try and pull a Sully. - Chesley Burnett "Sully" Sullenberger III (born January 23, 1951) is an American airline transport pilot (ATP), safety expert, and accident investigator who gained fame when he successfully ditched US Airways Flight 1549 in the Hudson River off Manhattan, New York City, on January 15, 2009, saving the lives of all 155 people on the aircraft.
  • Page 188
    • Titanic - See reference for Page 93 above.
  • Page 192
    • Hardee's ... Carl's Jr. - Hardee's Food Systems, Inc. is an American restaurant chain, which predominantly operates in the South and Midwest states. It is currently owned and operated by CKE Restaurants. Along with its sibling restaurant chain, Carl's Jr. (which predominantly operates in the Western and Southwestern states), Hardee's is the fifth largest fast-food restaurant chain in the United States.
  • Page 193
    • USA Today - USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. The newspaper vies with The Wall Street Journal for the position of having the widest circulation of any newspaper in the United States, something it had previously held since 2003.
  • Page 196
    • one with Nineveh and Tyre - This is a line from Rudyard Kipling's poem "Recessional" denoting the impermanence of great cities and states.
  • Page 201
    • Bactine - Bactine is an antiseptic, first-aid treatment produced by Bayer. It was first developed in 1947 and first used in 1950.
  • Page 212
    • Crayola - Crayola is a brand of artists' supplies manufactured by Crayola LLC (formerly Binney & Smith Company) and best known for its colored crayons.
  • Page 213
    • Eloi and Morlocks in The Time Machine - The Time Machine is a science fiction novella by H. G. Wells, published in 1895. In the story, the protagonist travels to the far future where he meets the Eloi, a society of small, elegant, childlike adults and the Morlocks, ape-like troglodytes.
  • Page 214
    • Miley Cyrus and Justin Bieber - Miley Ray Cyrus (born November 23, 1992) is an American actress and singer-songwriter. In 2010, Cyrus ranked number thirteen on Forbes' Celebrity 100. Justin Drew Bieber (born March 1, 1994) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, dancer, and actor. Bieber was named by Forbes magazine in 2012 as the third-most powerful celebrity in the world.
  • Page 216
    • the little girl with the little curl - A paraphrase of the first two lines of Henry Longfellow's poem "There Was a Little Girl".
  • Page 216
    • Denny's - Denny's is a full-service pancake house/coffee shop/fast casual family restaurant chain that is open around the clock.
  • Page 216
    • Hercule Poirot - Hercule Poirot is a fictional Belgian detective, created by Agatha Christie. Poirot is one of Christie's most famous and long-lived characters, appearing in 33 novels, one play, and more than 50 short stories published between 1920 and 1975.
  • Page 217
    • You could see for miles without channeling the Who. - The Who are an English rock band formed in 1964. "I Can See for Miles" is a song written by Pete Townshend of The Who, recorded for the band's 1967 album, The Who Sell Out.
  • Page 219
    • a double take Harpo Marx ... - Adolph "Harpo" Marx (later Arthur "Harpo" Marx; 1888 – 1964) was an American comedian film star, mime artist and musician, and the second-oldest of the Marx Brothers.
  • Page 220
    • a pair of sundogs - Sun dogs (or sundogs), mock suns or phantom suns, scientific name parhelia (singular parhelion), are an atmospheric phenomenon that consists of a pair of bright spots on either side on the sun, often co-occurring with a luminous ring known as a (22°) halo.
  • Page 222
    • 409 and some paper towels - Formula 409 is a brand of home cleaning products. The brand is currently owned by The Clorox Company.
  • Page 223
    • red as Rudolph's nose - Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is a fictional male reindeer with a glowing red nose, popularly known as "Santa's 9th Reindeer." When depicted, he is the lead reindeer pulling Santa's sleigh on Christmas Eve. The luminosity of his nose is so great that it illuminates the team's path through inclement winter weather.
  • Page 229
    • the times, they were a-changin' - The Times They Are a-Changin' is the third studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on January 13, 1964 by Columbia Records.
  • Page 232
    • Slaughterhouse Five - Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Children's Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death (1969) is a satirical novel by Kurt Vonnegut about World War II experiences and journeys through time of a soldier named Billy Pilgrim.
  • Page 233
    • Horace Greeley - Horace Greeley (1811 – 1872) was an American newspaper editor, a founder of the Liberal Republican Party, a reformer, a politician, and an outspoken opponent of slavery. Greeley supported liberal policies towards settlers; in a July 13, 1865 editorial, he famously advised "Go West, young man, go West and grow up with the country."
  • Page 235
    • waiting for AAA to come rescue him. - AAA (pronounced "triple A"), formerly the American Automobile Association, is a federation of motor clubs throughout North America. AAA is a not-for-profit member service organization which provides services to its members, including roadside assistance.
  • Page 239
    • Cheyne-Stokes - Cheyne–Stokes respiration is an abnormal pattern of breathing characterized by progressively deeper and sometimes faster breathing, followed by a gradual decrease that results in a temporary stop in breathing called an apnea.
  • Page 241
    • Jackson Pollock randomness - Paul Jackson Pollock (1912 – 1956), known as Jackson Pollock, was an influential American painter and a major figure in the abstract expressionist movement. He was well known for his unique style of drip painting.
  • Page 241
    • poussé-café - A layered (or "stacked") drink, sometimes called a pousse-café, is a kind of cocktail in which the slightly different densities of various liqueurs are used to create an array of colored layers, typically three to seven.
  • Page 241-2
    • you could never step into the same river twice - Heraclitus of Ephesus (c. 535 – c. 475 BCE) was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, a native of the Greek city Ephesus, Ionia, on the coast of Asia Minor. He is famous for his insistence on ever-present change in the universe, as stated in the famous saying, "No man ever steps in the same river twice".
  • Page 244
    • furbar'd - FUBAR stands for fucked up beyond all recognition/repair/reason. It dates from World War II.
  • Page 244
    • Scarlett O'Hara - Scarlett O'Hara is the protagonist in Margaret Mitchell's 1936 novel Gone with the Wind and in the later film of the same name.
  • Page 244
    • Felix, not Oscar - The Odd Couple is a play by Neil Simon, and a successful 1968 film and 1970s television series. The plot concerns two mismatched roommates: the neat, uptight Felix Ungar and the slovenly, easygoing Oscar Madison.
  • Page 248
    • TV a vast wasteland - Newton Norman Minow is an American attorney and former Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. In a speech given to the National Association of Broadcasters convention on May 9, 1961 he referred to TV as a "vast wasteland".
  • Page 249
    • Pat Robertson - Marion Gordon "Pat" Robertson is an American media mogul, executive chairman, and a former Southern Baptist minister, who generally supports conservative Christian ideals.
  • Page 250
    • All hope, abandon, ye who enter here - The quote is from Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy. It is inscribed over the gates of hell.
  • Page 250
    • caviar to the general - Caviar to the general is a good thing unappreciated by the ignorant; the phrase is originally a quotation from Shakespeare's Hamlet Act 2, scene 2.
  • Page 251
    • Even Lennon met Yoko. - John Winston Lennon, MBE (1940 – 1980), was an English musician, singer and songwriter who rose to worldwide fame as a founder member of the rock band the Beatles. Yoko Ono is a Japanese multimedia artist, singer, and peace activist. She is the second wife and widow of John Lennon. The two married in 1969 and when the Beatles broke up in 1970, many fans blamed Ono.
  • Page 252
    • want used books, they hit Alibris or AbeBooks or ... Amazon - Alibris is an online store that sells new books, used books, out-of-print books, rare books, and other media through an online network of independent booksellers. AbeBooks (formerly the Advanced Book Exchange) is an online marketplace for books. Most books listed are used, many are rare or out of print, and a growing number are new books. Amazon.com, Inc. is an American international electronic commerce company. It is the world's largest online retailer. Amazon.com started as an online bookstore, but soon diversified.
  • Page 259
    • Jupiter Pluvius - An epithet for the Roman god Jupiter and regarded as the giver of rain (pluvius is Latin for rainy). His relationship to baseball comes from early 20th century newspaper references related to rained-out ball games.
  • Page 263
    • doubleplus ungood - Newspeak is the fictional language in the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, written by George Orwell. It is a controlled, simplified language created by the totalitarian state as a tool to limit freedom of thought. "Doubleplus ungood" comes from this fictional language and means extremely bad.
  • Page 263
    • Del Taco - Del Taco is an American fast-food restaurant chain which specializes in American-style Mexican cuisine as well as American foods such as burgers, fries, and shakes.
  • Page 264
    • Wolfgang Puck - Wolfgang Johannes Puck (born Wolfgang Johannes Topfschnig; July 8, 1949) is an Austrian-born American celebrity chef, restaurateur, and occasional actor.
  • Page 266
    • lit a candle ... curse the dark - "It's better to light a candle than to curse the darkness" -- comes from an ancient Chinese proverb and is used as the motto of The Christophers, a Christian inspirational group.
  • Page 270
    • Besides that, Mrs. Lincoln, how'd you like the play? - A sarcastic phrase meant to downplay the complaint or misfortune of another person. It is a reference to the assassination of President Lincoln.
  • Page 279
    • she got off Sword Beach Ave. with almost as much relief as soldiers ... 1944 - Sword Beach was the code name given to one of the five main landing areas along the Normandy coast during the Allied invasion of German-occupied France that commenced on 6 June 1944.
  • Page 281
    • Forty days and forty nights - "And the rain was upon the earth forty days and forty nights." Bible, Genesis 7:12 KJV This caused the great flood that Noah and his family survived in the ark he built.
  • Page 288
    • Catskills shtick - The Catskill Mountains are are a large area in the southeastern portion of the state of New York. The Catskills are famous in American cultural history for being the site of stand up comedy.
  • Page 295
    • Welcome to Catch-22 - A catch-22 is a paradoxical situation from which an individual cannot escape because of contradictory rules. Joseph Heller coined the term in his 1961 novel Catch-22, which describes absurd bureaucratic constraints on soldiers in World War II.
  • Page 299
    • Vomit Comet - A reduced gravity aircraft is a type of fixed-wing aircraft that provides brief near-weightless environments for training astronauts, conducting research and making gravity-free movie shots. The unofficial nickname "vomit comet" became popular among those who experienced their operation.
  • Page 300
    • song about how much do you have to pay ... - "You have to pay to get out of / Going through all these things twice." Two lines of lyrics from Bob Dylan's song "Stuck Inside of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again".
  • Page 300
    • "Vanity of vanities --- all is vanity." - Bible, Ecclesiastes 1:2 KJV.
  • Page 305
    • "Truth? You can't handle the truth!" - Common misquote from A Few Good Men, a 1992 American military courtroom drama.
  • Page 306
    • Katrina drowned New Orleans - Hurricane Katrina was the deadliest and most destructive Atlantic tropical cyclone of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. The most significant number of deaths occurred in New Orleans, Louisiana, which flooded as the levee system catastrophically failed.
  • Page 312
    • Cujo ... Salem's Lot - Cujo is a 1981 psychological horror novel by Stephen King about a rabid dog. Salem's Lot is a 1975 horror fiction novel also by King.
  • Page 312
    • Thank-you, Albert Speer - Berthold Konrad Hermann Albert Speer, (1905-1981), was a German architect, author and, for part of World War II, Minister of Armaments and War Production, sometimes called "the first architect of the Third Reich".
  • Page 313
    • Beaver Cleaver - Theodore "The Beaver" Cleaver is the fictional title character in the American television series Leave It to Beaver (1957-1963).
  • Page 314
    • Bullwinkle crossing - The Rocky & Bullwinkle Show is an American animated television series that originally aired from November 19, 1959, to June 27, 1964, on the ABC and NBC television networks. Bullwinkle, one of the stars, was an animated moose.
  • Page 315
    • "Werewolves of London" ... Warren Zevon - "Werewolves of London" is a rock song composed by LeRoy Marinell, Waddy Wachtel, and Warren Zevon and performed by Zevon on his 1978 album Excitable Boy. Warren William Zevon (January 24, 1947 – September 7, 2003) was an American rock singer-songwriter and musician.
  • Page 331
    • Henry VIII's steel suit. - Henry VIII (1491-1547) was a Tudor king of England, the son of that dynasty's founder, Henry VII.
  • Page 335
    • D'oh! ... Simpsons episode - "D'oh!" is a catchphrase used by the fictional character Homer Simpson, from the long-running American animated sitcom The Simpsons (1989–present). It is typically used when Homer injures himself, realizes that he has done something stupid, or when something bad has happened or is about to happen to him.
  • Page 336
    • ... offer you a manger. - A manger, or trough, is a feeder that is made of carved stone, wood, or metal construction and is used to hold food for animals (as in a stable). It is also a Christian symbol, associated with nativity scenes where Mary, forced by necessity to stay in a stable instead of an inn, placed the baby Jesus in a manger.
  • Page 336
    • a plastic band, even without an Ono. - See reference for Page 251 above. Plastic Ono Band was a band concept announced by John Lennon and Yoko Ono in 1969 before the dissolution of the Beatles.
  • Page 340
    • sheared any acrylics - Acrylic fibers are synthetic fibers made from a polymer (polyacrylonitrile) and are lightweight, soft, and warm, with a wool-like feel. However, it isn't as warm as alternatives like wool.
  • Page 340
    • skinned any naugas - Naugahyde (sometimes abbreviated to Nauga) is an American brand of artificial leather (or "pleather" from plastic leather). Naugahyde is a composite of a knit fabric backing and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic coating.
  • Page 349
    • The rabbit died - laughing ... - The rabbit test, or "Friedman test", was an early pregnancy test developed in 1931. The original test actually used mice, and was based upon the observation that when urine from a female in the early months of pregnancy is injected into immature female mice, the ovaries of the mice enlarge and show follicular maturation.
  • Page 349
    • ... the gal on the '70s TV show said - Refers to the show Maude where the titular character discovers she is pregnant at age 47.
  • Page 350
    • The end of the world as we know it - See reference for Page 144 above.
  • Page 351
    • scrubbed her hands like Lady Macbeth - Lady Macbeth is a character in Shakespeare's Macbeth (c.1603–1607). She is the wife to the play's protagonist, Macbeth, a Scottish nobleman. After goading him into committing regicide, she suffers pangs of guilt for her part in the crime. She sleepwalks and attempts to wash the metaphorical blood off her hands.
  • Page 357
    • slipped a Mickey Finn into the water - In slang, a Mickey Finn is a drink laced with a drug (especially chloral hydrate) given to someone without their knowledge in order to incapacitate them.
  • Page 367
    • Marie Antoinette heading for the guillotine - Marie Antoinette (1755 – 1793), born an Archduchess of Austria, was Dauphine of France from 1770 to 1774 and Queen of France and Navarre from 1774 to 1792. She was tried and convicted by the Revolutionary Tribunal of treason to the principles of the French Revolution.
  • Page 368
    • Gunga Din - "Gunga Din" (1892) is a poem by Rudyard Kipling. The title character is an Indian water-bearer who saves a soldier's life but is soon shot and killed. In the final three lines, the soldier regrets the abuse he dealt to Din and admits that Din is the better man of the two for sacrificing his own life to save another.
  • Page 369
    • Bridezilla - The word "bridezilla" is a portmanteau combining bride with the fictional rampaging beast "Godzilla" to indicate a difficult bride.
  • Page 372
    • Iditarod - The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race is an annual long-distance sled dog race run in early March from Anchorage to Nome in Alaska.
  • Page 375
    • three-dog night ... turkey of a band - Three Dog Night is an American rock band formed in 1968. The name came from a magazine article about indigenous Australians, in which it was explained that on cold nights they would customarily sleep in a hole in the ground whilst embracing a dingo, a native species of wild dog. On colder nights they would sleep with two dogs and if the night were freezing, it was a "three dog night".
  • Page 378
    • Dorian Gray - The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), by Oscar Wilde has the titular Dorian Gray sell his soul so that a full-length portrait of him ages rather than himself.
  • Page 378
    • Selectrics - The IBM Selectric typewriter was a highly successful model line of electric typewriters introduced by IBM in 1961. Various models were in production until 1984.
  • Page 381
    • this winter of the earth's discontent - "Winter of our discontent" is part of the opening line from William Shakespeare's Richard III. It is also the title of John Steinbeck's last novel (1961) which used the Shakespeare quote as its source.
  • Page 383
    • fifteen McLuhan minutes of fame - Herbert Marshall McLuhan, CC (1911 – 1980) was a Canadian philosopher of communication theory and a public intellectual. His work is viewed as one of the cornerstones of the study of media theory, as well as having practical applications in the advertising and television industries. Fifteen minutes of fame is short-lived media publicity or celebrity of an individual or phenomenon. The expression is credited to Andy Warhol who may have adapted this from a theory of McLuhan's.
  • Page 385
    • American Idol - American Idol is an American singing competition series created by Simon Fuller and produced by 19 Entertainment It based on the British series Pop Idol. It began airing on Fox on June 11, 2002 to present.
  • Page 387
    • Victorian thundermug - Thundermug is a slang expression for chamber pot, a bowl-shaped container with a handle, and often a lid, kept in the bedroom under a bed or in the cabinet of a nightstand and generally used as a toilet at night.
  • Page 399
    JohnMadden
    • If you took John Madden ... - John Earl Madden (born April 10, 1936) is a former American football player in the National Football League, a former Super Bowl-winning head coach with the Oakland Raiders in the American Football Conference of the NFL, and a former color commentator for NFL telecasts.
  • Page 405
    • DDT - DDT ("dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane") is a colorless, crystalline, tasteless and almost odorless organochloride known for its insecticidal properties. It was used from World War II until it was banned for agricultural use in the US in 1972 and then the rest of the world for environmental reasons.
  • Page 416
    • you were there - You Are There is an American historical educational television and radio series broadcast over the CBS Radio and CBS Television networks from 1953 to 1957. It was hosted by Walter Cronkite who ended the episode with a summary and then the phrase "What sort of day was it? A day like all days, filled with those events that alter and illuminate our times... all things are as they were then, and you were there."

Contemporary Figures and ThingsEdit

  • waiting for AAA to come rescue him. - AAA (pronounced "triple A"), formerly the American Automobile Association, is a federation of motor clubs throughout North America. AAA is a not-for-profit member service organization which provides services to its members, including roadside assistance.[1]
  • sheared any acrylics - Acrylic fibers are synthetic fibers made from a polymer (polyacrylonitrile) and are lightweight, soft, and warm, with a wool-like feel. However, it isn't as warm as alternatives like wool.[2]
  • want used books, they hit Alibris or AbeBooks or ... Amazon - Alibris is an online store that sells new books, used books, out-of-print books, rare books, and other media through an online network of independent booksellers. AbeBooks (formerly the Advanced Book Exchange) is an online marketplace for books. Most books listed are used, many are rare or out of print, and a growing number are new books. Amazon.com, Inc. is an American international electronic commerce company. It is the world's largest online retailer. Amazon.com started as an online bookstore, but soon diversified.[3]
  • Archie McPhee - Archie McPhee is a Seattle-based novelty dealer owned by Mark Pahlow. Begun in the 1970s in Los Angeles as the mail-order business Accoutrements, in 1983 it opened a retail outlet dubbed "Archie McPhee" after Pahlow's wife's great-uncle.[4]
  • Bactine - Bactine is an antiseptic, first-aid treatment produced by Bayer. It was first developed in 1947 and first used in 1950.[5]
  • Bebop Deluxe - Be-Bop Deluxe were an English progressive rock band who achieved critical acclaim and moderate commercial success during the mid to late 1970s.[6]
  • Best Foods mayonnaise was Hellman's back here - Hellmann's and Best Foods are brand names that are used for the same line of mayonnaise and other food products. The Best Foods brand is sold in the United States west of the Rocky Mountains, and also in Asia, Australia, and New Zealand.[8]
  • Miley Cyrus and Justin Bieber - Justin Drew Bieber (born March 1, 1994) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, dancer, and actor. Bieber was named by Forbes magazine in 2012 as the third-most powerful celebrity in the world.[9]
  • BlackBerry - BlackBerry is a line of smartphones and services designed and marketed by BlackBerry Limited (formerly known as Research In Motion/RIM).[10]
  • Bridezilla - The word "bridezilla" is a portmanteau combining bride with the fictional rampaging beast "Godzilla" to indicate a difficult bride.[11]
  • Brillo fright wig - Brillo Pad is a trade name for a scouring pad, used for cleaning dishes, and made from steel wool impregnated with soap.[12]
  • Brita filter - BRITA GmbH is a German company founded in 1966 by Heinz Hankammer with headquarters in Taunusstein, Hesse, Germany, that specializes in water filtration products.[13]
  • Ken Burns - Kenneth Lauren "Ken" Burns (born July 29, 1953) is an American director and producer of documentary films, known for his style of using archival footage and photographs.[14]
  • Michael Jackson or Mariah Carey would have committed seppuku - Mariah Carey is an American singer, songwriter, actress, record producer, and philanthropist. In 2000 Carey signed a $100 million recording contract with Virgin Records.[15]
  • Hardee's ... Carl's Jr. - Hardee's Food Systems, Inc. is an American restaurant chain, which predominantly operates in the South and Midwest states. It is currently owned and operated by CKE Restaurants. Along with its sibling restaurant chain, Carl's Jr. (which predominantly operates in the Western and Southwestern states), Hardee's is the fifth largest fast-food restaurant chain in the United States.[16]
  • Carnegie Hall - Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City, United States. Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music.[17]
  • Catskills shtick - The Catskill Mountains are are a large area in the southeastern portion of the state of New York. The Catskills are famous in American cultural history for being the site of stand up comedy.[18]
  • Cheyne-Stokes - Cheyne–Stokes respiration is an abnormal pattern of breathing characterized by progressively deeper and sometimes faster breathing, followed by a gradual decrease that results in a temporary stop in breathing called an apnea.[19]
  • Clairol - Clairol is a personal-care-product division of Procter & Gamble begun in 1931. The company was widely recognized in its home country, the United States, for its "Miss Clairol" home hair-coloring kit introduced in 1956.[20]
  • Crank - Crank is slang for a low purity, crystallized Methamphetamine that is administered in a powder form.[21]
  • Crayola - Crayola is a brand of artists' supplies manufactured by Crayola LLC (formerly Binney & Smith Company) and best known for its colored crayons.[22]
  • Miley Cyrus and Justin Bieber - Miley Ray Cyrus (born November 23, 1992) is an American actress and singer-songwriter. In 2010, Cyrus ranked number thirteen on Forbes' Celebrity 100.[23]
  • DDT - DDT ("dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane") is a colorless, crystalline, tasteless and almost odorless organochloride known for its insecticidal properties. It was used from World War II until it was banned for agricultural use in the US in 1972 and then the rest of the world for environmental reasons.[24]
  • Del Taco - Del Taco is an American fast-food restaurant chain which specializes in American-style Mexican cuisine as well as American foods such as burgers, fries, and shakes.[25]
  • Denny's - Denny's is a full-service pancake house/coffee shop/fast casual family restaurant chain that is open around the clock.[26]
  • Dylan - Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American musician, singer-songwriter, artist, and writer. He has been an influential figure in popular music and culture for more than five decades.[27]
  • Energizer Bunny - The Energizer Bunny is the marketing icon and mascot of Energizer batteries in North America. It is a pink toy rabbit wearing sunglasses that beats a bass drum bearing the Energizer logo. The mascot is promoted as being able to continue operating indefinitely, or at least much longer than similar toys using rival brands' batteries. In North America the term "Energizer Bunny" has entered the vernacular as a term for anything that continues endlessly.[28]
  • 409 and some paper towels - Formula 409 is a brand of home cleaning products. The brand is currently owned by The Clorox Company.[29]
  • Brillo fright wig - A fright wig is a wig with hair that stands out from the head.[30]
  • furbar'd - FUBAR stands for fucked up beyond all recognition/repair/reason. It dates from World War II.[31]
  • Guinness - Guinness is a popular Irish dry stout that originated in the brewery of Arthur Guinness (1725–1803) at St. James's Gate, Dublin.[32]
  • Hardee's ... Carl's Jr. - Hardee's Food Systems, Inc. is an American restaurant chain, which predominantly operates in the South and Midwest states. It is currently owned and operated by CKE Restaurants. Along with its sibling restaurant chain, Carl's Jr. (which predominantly operates in the Western and Southwestern states), Hardee's is the fifth largest fast-food restaurant chain in the United States.[33]
  • Harvey Wallbanger - The Harvey Wallbanger is a mixed drink made with vodka, Galliano, and orange juice.[34]
  • Hendrix - James Marshall "Jimi" Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American musician, singer, and songwriter. Although his mainstream career spanned only four years, he is widely regarded as one of the most influential electric guitarists in the history of popular music.[36]
  • Iditarod - The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race is an annual long-distance sled dog race run in early March from Anchorage to Nome in Alaska.[37]
  • Michael Jackson or Mariah Carey would have committed seppuku - Michael Joseph Jackson was an American singer-songwriter, actor, musician, dancer, businessman, and philanthropist. It is estimated that Jackson earned about $750 million in his lifetime.[38]
  • Jenny Craig frozen dinner - Jenny Craig, Inc., often known simply as Jenny Craig, is a weight loss, weight management, and nutrition company founded in 1983 by Jenny Craig and her husband, Sidney Craig.[39]
  • ... flailing away against Randy Johnson in his prime. - Randall David "Randy" Johnson is a retired American professional baseball player. A left-handed pitcher, Johnson played in Major League Baseball for 22 seasons. Johnson is a member of the 300 win club.[40]
  • ... if the Jolly Green Giant dropped a tray from his freezer. - The Jolly Green Giant was introduced as the mascot of the then Minnesota Valley Canning Company (Green Giant Company since 1950) in 1928.[41]
  • Katrina drowned New Orleans - Hurricane Katrina was the deadliest and most destructive Atlantic tropical cyclone of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. The most significant number of deaths occurred in New Orleans, Louisiana, which flooded as the levee system catastrophically failed.[42]
  • Even Lennon met Yoko. - John Winston Lennon, MBE (1940 – 1980), was an English musician, singer and songwriter who rose to worldwide fame as a founder member of the rock band the Beatles. Yoko Ono is a Japanese multimedia artist, singer, and peace activist. She is the second wife and widow of John Lennon. The two married in 1969 and when the Beatles broke up in 1970, many fans blamed Ono.[43]
  • If you took John Madden ... - John Earl Madden (born April 10, 1936) is a former American football player in the National Football League, a former Super Bowl-winning head coach with the Oakland Raiders in the American Football Conference of the NFL, and a former color commentator for NFL telecasts.[44]
  • ... offer you a manger. - A manger, or trough, is a feeder that is made of carved stone, wood, or metal construction and is used to hold food for animals (as in a stable). It is also a Christian symbol, associated with nativity scenes where Mary, forced by necessity to stay in a stable instead of an inn, placed the baby Jesus in a manger.[45]
  • Marshall stacks - Marshall Amplification is a British company that designs and manufactures music amplifiers, speaker cabinets, brands personal headphones/earphones (made by Zound Industries), and, having acquired Natal Drums, drums and bongos.[46]
  • fifteen McLuhan minutes of fame - Herbert Marshall McLuhan, CC (1911 – 1980) was a Canadian philosopher of communication theory and a public intellectual. His work is viewed as one of the cornerstones of the study of media theory, as well as having practical applications in the advertising and television industries.[47]
  • ... louder than a Metallica concert. - Metallica is an American heavy metal band from Los Angeles, California. The band's fast tempos, instrumentals, and aggressive musicianship placed them as one of the founding "big four" of thrash metal.[48]
  • slipped a Mickey Finn into the water - In slang, a Mickey Finn is a drink laced with a drug (especially chloral hydrate) given to someone without their knowledge in order to incapacitate them.[49]
  • Moose Drool - Moose Drool is a brown ale brewed by Big Sky Brewing Company located in Missoula, Montana.[50]
  • Motel 6 - Motel 6 is a major chain of budget motels with more than 1,000 locations in the United States and Canada.[51]
  • National Geographic documentary. - The National Geographic Society, headquartered in Washington, DC in the United States, is one of the largest nonprofit scientific and educational institutions in the world.[52]
  • skinned any naugas - Naugahyde (sometimes abbreviated to Nauga) is an American brand of artificial leather (or "pleather" from plastic leather). Naugahyde is a composite of a knit fabric backing and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic coating.[53]
  • Phi Beta Kappa - The Phi Beta Kappa Society is the oldest honor society for the liberal arts and sciences and aims to promote and advocate excellence in the field.[54]
  • a plastic band, even without an Ono. - Plastic Ono Band was a band concept announced by John Lennon and Yoko Ono in 1969 before the dissolution of the Beatles.[55]
  • Popeyes Chicken & Buscuits - Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen is an American chain of fried chicken fast food restaurants founded in 1972 in New Orleans, Louisiana. It is often referred to as Popeyes and sometimes as Popeyes Chicken & Biscuits or Popeyes Chicken & Seafood.[56]
  • poussé-café - A layered (or "stacked") drink, sometimes called a pousse-café, is a kind of cocktail in which the slightly different densities of various liqueurs are used to create an array of colored layers, typically three to seven.[57]
  • Wolfgang Puck - Wolfgang Johannes Puck (born Wolfgang Johannes Topfschnig; July 8, 1949) is an Austrian-born American celebrity chef, restaurateur, and occasional actor.[58]
  • ... the end of the world as she knew it - the REM tune ... - R.E.M. was an American rock band from Athens, Georgia, formed in 1980 and amicably disbanded in September 2011.[59]
  • ... but not the Ritz-Carlton, either. - The Ritz-Carlton Hotels is a chain of luxury hotels and operates 84 luxury hotels and resorts in major cities and resorts in 26 countries worldwide.[60]
  • Pat Robertson - Marion Gordon "Pat" Robertson is an American media mogul, executive chairman, and a former Southern Baptist minister, who generally supports conservative Christian ideals.[61]
  • ... cover of the Rolling Stone - Rolling Stone is a magazine published every two weeks that focuses on politics and popular culture. It was founded in San Francisco, California in 1967.[62]
  • Santa Anas - The Santa Ana winds are strong, extremely dry down-slope winds that originate inland and affect coastal Southern California. The winds are known especially for the hot dry weather (often the hottest of the year) that they bring in the fall, and are infamous for fanning regional wildfires.[63]
  • Selectrics - The IBM Selectric typewriter was a highly successful model line of electric typewriters introduced by IBM in 1961. Various models were in production until 1984.[64]
  • ... try and pull a Sully. - Chesley Burnett "Sully" Sullenberger III (born January 23, 1951) is an American airline transport pilot (ATP), safety expert, and accident investigator who gained fame when he successfully ditched US Airways Flight 1549 in the Hudson River off Manhattan, New York City, on January 15, 2009, saving the lives of all 155 people on the aircraft.[65]
  • a pair of sundogs - Sun dogs (or sundogs), mock suns or phantom suns, scientific name parhelia (singular parhelion), are an atmospheric phenomenon that consists of a pair of bright spots on either side on the sun, often co-occurring with a luminous ring known as a (22°) halo.[66]
  • They Might Be Giants - They Might Be Giants is an American alternative rock band formed in 1982. The group is best known for an unconventional and experimental style of alternative music.[67]
  • three-dog night ... turkey of a band - Three Dog Night is an American rock band formed in 1968. The name came from a magazine article about indigenous Australians, in which it was explained that on cold nights they would customarily sleep in a hole in the ground whilst embracing a dingo, a native species of wild dog. On colder nights they would sleep with two dogs and if the night were freezing, it was a "three dog night".[68]
  • Robin Trower - Robin Leonard Trower (born 9 March 1945) is an English rock guitarist and vocalist who achieved success with Procol Harum during the 1960s, and then again as the bandleader of his own power trio.[69]
  • USA Today - USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. The newspaper vies with The Wall Street Journal for the position of having the widest circulation of any newspaper in the United States, something it had previously held since 2003.[70]
  • Vomit Comet - A reduced gravity aircraft is a type of fixed-wing aircraft that provides brief near-weightless environments for training astronauts, conducting research and making gravity-free movie shots. The unofficial nickname "vomit comet" became popular among those who experienced their operation.[71]
  • You could see for miles without channeling the Who. - The Who are an English rock band formed in 1964.[72]
  • "Werewolves of London" ... Warren Zevon - Warren William Zevon (January 24, 1947 – September 7, 2003) was an American rock singer-songwriter and musician and one of the composers of "Werewolves of London".[73]

Fictional WorksEdit

  • "Addicted to Love" - "Addicted to Love" is a song by English rock singer Robert Palmer released in 1986.[74]
  • American Idol - American Idol is an American singing competition series created by Simon Fuller and produced by 19 Entertainment It based on the British series Pop Idol. It began airing on Fox on June 11, 2002 to present.[75]
  • Apocalypse Now - Apocalypse Now is a 1979 American epic war film set during the Vietnam War, directed and produced by Francis Ford Coppola and starring Martin Sheen, Marlon Brando, and Robert Duvall.[76]
  • ... round as Charlie Brown's head. - Charlie Brown is the protagonist of the comic strip Peanuts by Charles M. Schulz. As drawn, he had a round head.[77]
  • Bullwinkle crossing - The Rocky & Bullwinkle Show is an American animated television series that originally aired from November 19, 1959, to June 27, 1964, on the ABC and NBC television networks. Bullwinkle, one of the stars, was an animated moose.[78]
  • The Burning Bed - The Burning Bed is the name of both a non-fiction book by Faith McNulty about battered housewife Francine Hughes, and the TV-movie adaptation starred Farrah Fawcett as Hughes.[79]
  • Welcome to Catch-22 - A catch-22 is a paradoxical situation from which an individual cannot escape because of contradictory rules. Joseph Heller coined the term in his 1961 novel Catch-22, which describes absurd bureaucratic constraints on soldiers in World War II.[80]
  • Beaver Cleaver - Theodore "The Beaver" Cleaver is the fictional title character in the American television series Leave It to Beaver (1957-1963).[81]
  • Cowboy Bebop - Cowboy Bebop is a 1998 Japanese anime series developed by Sunrise. The twenty-six episodes ("sessions") of the series are set in the year 2071, and follow the adventures of a bounty hunter crew traveling on the Bebop (their spaceship).[82]
  • Cujo ... Salem's Lot - Cujo is a 1981 psychological horror novel by Stephen King about a rabid dog.[83]
  • Felix, not Oscar - The Odd Couple is a play by Neil Simon, and a successful 1968 film and 1970s television series. The plot concerns two mismatched roommates: the neat, uptight Felix Ungar and the slovenly, easygoing Oscar Madison.[84]
  • Gunga Din - "Gunga Din" (1892) is a poem by Rudyard Kipling. The title character is an Indian water-bearer who saves a soldier's life but is soon shot and killed. In the final three lines, the soldier regrets the abuse he dealt to Din and admits that Din is the better man of the two for sacrificing his own life to save another.[85]
  • Dorian Gray - The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), by Oscar Wilde has the titular Dorian Gray sell his soul so that a full-length portrait of him ages rather than himself.[86]
  • gravedigger in Hamlet say? ... familiarity lending a quality of easiness - In Shakespeare's play Hamlet one gravedigger singing a humorous song while digging leads Horatio to explain "Custom hath made it in him a property of easiness."[87]
  • You could see for miles without channeling the Who. - The Who are an English rock band formed in 1964. "I Can See for Miles" is a song written by Pete Townshend of The Who, recorded for the band's 1967 album, The Who Sell Out.[88]
  • ... parody of Kipling's "If" - "If—" is a poem by British Nobel laureate Rudyard Kipling, written in 1895 and first published in Rewards and Fairies, 1910. It is a tribute to Leander Starr Jameson, and is written in the form of paternal advice to the poet's son. As poetry, "If—" is a literary example of Victorian-era stoicism.[89]
  • ... the end of the world as she knew it - the REM tune ... - R.E.M. was an American rock band from Athens, Georgia, formed in 1980 and amicably disbanded in September 2011. "It's the End of the World as We Know It (And I Feel Fine)" is a song by R.E.M. which first appeared on their 1987 album Document.[90]
  • scrubbed her hands like Lady Macbeth - Lady Macbeth is a character in William Shakespeare's Macbeth (c. 1606). She is the wife of the play's protagonist, Lord Macbeth of Scotland. After goading him into committing regicide, she suffers pangs of guilt for her part in the crime. She sleepwalks and attempts to wash the metaphorical blood off her hands.[91]
  • ... the gal on the '70s TV show said - Refers to the show Maude where the titular character discovers she is pregnant at age 47.[92]
  • Keats would have got a C- in Western Civ - John Keats (1795–1821) was an English Romantic poet. In Keats' poem "On first looking into Chapman’s Homer" he mistakenly has Cortez spot the Pacific not Balboa.[93]
  • Felix, not Oscar - The Odd Couple is a play by Neil Simon, and a successful 1968 film and 1970s television series. The plot concerns two mismatched roommates: the neat, uptight Felix Ungar and the slovenly, easygoing Oscar Madison.[94]
  • Scarlett O'Hara - Scarlett O'Hara is the protagonist in Margaret Mitchell's 1936 novel Gone with the Wind and in the later film of the same name.[95]
  • Hercule Poirot - Hercule Poirot is a fictional Belgian detective, created by Agatha Christie. Poirot is one of Christie's most famous and long-lived characters, appearing in 33 novels, one play, and more than 50 short stories published between 1920 and 1975.[96]
  • red as Rudolph's nose - Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer is a fictional male reindeer with a glowing red nose, popularly known as "Santa's 9th Reindeer." When depicted, he is the lead reindeer pulling Santa's sleigh on Christmas Eve. The luminosity of his nose is so great that it illuminates the team's path through inclement winter weather.[97]
  • Cujo ... Salem's Lot - Salem's Lot is a 1975 horror fiction novel by Stephen King.[98]
  • D'oh! ... Simpsons episode - "D'oh!" is a catchphrase used by the fictional character Homer Simpson, from the long-running American animated sitcom The Simpsons (1989–present). It is typically used when Homer injures himself, realizes that he has done something stupid, or when something bad has happened or is about to happen to him.[99]
  • Slaughterhouse Five - Slaughterhouse-Five, or The Children's Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death (1969) is a satirical novel by Kurt Vonnegut about World War II experiences and journeys through time of a soldier named Billy Pilgrim.[100]
  • Stinky Cheese Man - The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales is a postmodern children's book by Jon Scieszka. Published in 1992 by Viking, it is a collection of twisted, humorous parodies of famous children's stories and fairy tales, such as "Little Red Riding Hood", "The Ugly Duckling" and "The Gingerbread Man".[101]
  • song about how much do you have to pay ... - "You have to pay to get out of / Going through all these things twice." Two lines of lyrics from Bob Dylan's song "Stuck Inside of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again".[102]
  • Eloi and Morlocks in The Time Machine - The Time Machine is a science fiction novella by H. G. Wells, published in 1895. In the story, the protagonist travels to the far future where he meets the Eloi, a society of small, elegant, childlike adults and the Morlocks, ape-like troglodytes.[104]
  • the times, they were a-changin' - The Times They Are a-Changin' is the third studio album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on January 13, 1964 by Columbia Records.[105]
  • ... that song about tomorrow, tomorrow? - "Tomorrow" is a popular song from the musical Annie expressing the protagonists optimistic outlook.[106]
  • ... the USA from New york City's viewpoint. - View of the World from 9th Avenue is a 1976 illustration by Saul Steinberg that served as the cover of the March 29, 1976, edition of The New Yorker. The work presents the view from Manhattan of the rest of the world showing Manhattan as the center of the world.[107]
  • "Werewolves of London" ... Warren Zevon - "Werewolves of London" is a rock song composed by LeRoy Marinell, Waddy Wachtel, and Warren Zevon and performed by Zevon on his 1978 album Excitable Boy.[108]
  • So why don't we get drunk and screw? ... country song ... - "Why Don't We Get Drunk" is a novelty song written and performed by Jimmy Buffett. It was a b-side to "The Great Filling Station Holdup", released in 1973. The first line of the chorus was: "Why don't we get drunk an' screw?"[109]

Historical Figures and ThingsEdit

  • Marie Antoinette heading for the guillotine - Marie Antoinette (1755 – 1793), born an Archduchess of Austria, was Dauphine of France from 1770 to 1774 and Queen of France and Navarre from 1774 to 1792. She was tried and convicted by the Revolutionary Tribunal of treason to the principles of the French Revolution.[110]
  • Balboa - Vasco de Balboa was a Spanish explorer best known for having crossed the Isthmus of Panama to the Pacific Ocean becoming the first European to lead an expedition to have seen or reached the Pacific from the New World.[111]
  • Not the Black Hole of Calcutta ... - The Black Hole of Calcutta was a small dungeon in the old Fort William in Calcutta, India, where troops of the Nawab of Bengal, Siraj ud-Daulah, held British prisoners of war after the capture of the fort on 20 June 1756.[112]
  • TS Eliot - Thomas Stearns "T. S." Eliot (1888 – 1965) was a playwright, literary critic, and an important English-language poet of the 20th century. "This is the way the world ends, not with a bang but a whimper.", alluded to by Kelly Birnbaum are the last two lines in the final stanza of Eliot's The Hollow Men.[114]
  • Horace Greeley - Horace Greeley (1811 – 1872) was an American newspaper editor, a founder of the Liberal Republican Party, a reformer, a politician, and an outspoken opponent of slavery.[115]
  • the Hermitage - The State Hermitage is a museum of art and culture in St. Petersburg, Russia. One of the largest and oldest museums in the world, it was founded in 1764 by Catherine the Great and has been open to the public since 1852.[117]
  • Jupiter Pluvius - An epithet for the Roman god Jupiter and regarded as the giver of rain (pluvius is Latin for rainy). His relationship to baseball comes from early 20th century newspaper references related to rained-out ball games.[118]
  • Keats would have got a C- in Western Civ - John Keats (1795 – 1821) was an English Romantic poet. In Keats' poem "On first looking into Chapman’s Homer" he mistakenly has Cortez spot the Pacific not Balboa.[119]
  • a double take Harpo Marx ... - Adolph "Harpo" Marx (later Arthur "Harpo" Marx; 1888 – 1964) was an American comedian film star, mime artist and musician, and the second-oldest of the Marx Brothers.[120]
  • Jackson Pollock randomness - Paul Jackson Pollock (1912 – 1956), known as Jackson Pollock, was an influential American painter and a major figure in the abstract expressionist movement. He was well known for his unique style of drip painting.[121]
  • The rabbit died - laughing ... - The rabbit test, or "Friedman test", was an early pregnancy test developed in 1931. The original test actually used mice, and was based upon the observation that when urine from a female in the early months of pregnancy is injected into immature female mice, the ovaries of the mice enlarge and show follicular maturation.[122]
  • ... plowed through the chow like Sherman plowing through Georgia ... - William Sherman's Savannah Campaign during the American Civil War was a march from Atlanta and ended with the capture of the port of Savannah. Sherman's forces destroyed military targets as well as industry, infrastructure, and other civilian property during the march.[123]
  • Thank-you, Albert Speer - Berthold Konrad Hermann Albert Speer, (1905-1981), was a German architect, author and, for part of World War II, Minister of Armaments and War Production, sometimes called "the first architect of the Third Reich".[124]
  • she got off Sword Beach Ave. with almost as much relief as soldiers ... 1944 - Sword Beach was the code name given to one of the five main landing areas along the Normandy coast during the Allied invasion of German-occupied France that commenced on 6 June 1944.[125]
  • Theocritus - Theocritus, the creator of Ancient Greek bucolic poetry, flourished in the 3rd century BC.[126]
  • Victorian thundermug - Thundermug is a slang expression for chamber pot, a bowl-shaped container with a handle, and often a lid, kept in the bedroom under a bed or in the cabinet of a nightstand and generally used as a toilet at night.[127]
  • Titanic - The RMS Titanic was a British Olympic class passenger liner that became famous for her collision with an iceberg on April 14, 1912 and her dramatic sinking on April 15, 1912.[128]

QuotesEdit

  • a man's reach ... - "Ah, but a man's reach should exceed his grasp, / Or what's a heaven for?" are two lines from Robert Browning's 1855 poem "Andrea del Sarto".[129]
  • All hope, abandon, ye who enter here - The quote is from Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy. It is inscribed over the gates of hell.[131]
  • Besides that, Mrs. Lincoln, how'd you like the play? - A sarcastic phrase meant to downplay the complaint or misfortune of another person. It is a reference to the assassination of President Lincoln.[132]
  • ... when the Big One'll hit. - "The Big One" is a term often used in casual conversation by residents of California, Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia to describe the megathrust earthquake anticipated as inevitably striking the Cascadia Subduction Zone.[133]
  • caviar to the general - Caviar to the general is a good thing unappreciated by the ignorant; the phrase is originally a quotation from Shakespeare's Hamlet Act 2, scene 2.[134]
  • gravedigger in Hamlet say? ... familiarity lending a quality of easiness - In Shakespeare's play Hamlet one gravedigger singing a humorous song while digging leads Horatio to explain "Custom hath made it in him a property of easiness."[135]
  • D'oh! ... Simpsons episode - "D'oh!" is a catchphrase used by the fictional character Homer Simpson, from the long-running American animated sitcom The Simpsons (1989–present). It is typically used when Homer injures himself, realizes that he has done something stupid, or when something bad has happened or is about to happen to him.[136]
  • doubleplus ungood - Newspeak is the fictional language in the novel Nineteen Eighty-Four, written by George Orwell. It is a controlled, simplified language created by the totalitarian state as a tool to limit freedom of thought. "Doubleplus ungood" comes from this fictional language and means extremely bad.[137]
  • fifteen McLuhan minutes of fame - Herbert Marshall McLuhan, CC (1911 – 1980) was a Canadian philosopher of communication theory and a public intellectual. His work is viewed as one of the cornerstones of the study of media theory, as well as having practical applications in the advertising and television industries. Fifteen minutes of fame is short-lived media publicity or celebrity of an individual or phenomenon. The expression is credited to Andy Warhol who may have adapted this from a theory of McLuhan's.ref>Ibid, pg. 383.</ref>
  • Forty days and forty nights - "And the rain was upon the earth forty days and forty nights." Bible, Genesis 7:12 KJV This caused the great flood that Noah and his family survived in the ark he built.[138]
  • Horace Greeley - Horace Greeley (1811 – 1872) was an American newspaper editor. Greeley supported liberal policies towards settlers; in a July 13, 1865 editorial, he famously advised "Go West, young man, go West and grow up with the country."[139]
  • ... employees going postal. - Going postal, in American English slang, means becoming extremely and uncontrollably angry, often to the point of violence, and usually in a workplace environment.[140]
  • I love the smell of hydrogen sulfide in the morning. Smells like tenure. - This is a parody of a famous quote from Apocalypse Now: "I love the smell of napalm in the morning ... Smelled like victory".[141]
  • lit a candle ... curse the dark - "It's better to light a candle than to curse the darkness" -- comes from an ancient Chinese proverb and is used as the motto of The Christophers, a Christian inspirational group.[142]
  • life, the universe and everything - In The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams, a group of hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings demand to learn the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, The Universe, and Everything from the supercomputer, Deep Thought.[143]
  • you could never step into the same river twice - Heraclitus of Ephesus (c. 535 – c. 475 BCE) was a pre-Socratic Greek philosopher, a native of the Greek city Ephesus, Ionia, on the coast of Asia Minor. He is famous for his insistence on ever-present change in the universe, as stated in the famous saying, "No man ever steps in the same river twice".[144]
  • the little girl with the little curl - A paraphrase of the first two lines of Henry Longfellow's poem "There Was a Little Girl".[145]
  • "maybe the horse will learn to sing." - Fable attributed to Herodotus, an ancient Greek historian.[146]
  • one with Nineveh and Tyre - This is a line from Rudyard Kipling's poem "Recessional" denoting the impermanence of great cities and states.[147]
  • T.S. Eliot - "This is the way the world ends, not with a bang but a whimper.", alluded to by Kelly Birnbaum, are the last two lines in the final stanza of Eliot's The Hollow Men.[148]
  • "Truth? You can't handle the truth!" - Common misquote from A Few Good Men, a 1992 American military courtroom drama.[149]
  • ... liked turning it up to eleven. - "Up to eleven" or "these go to eleven" is an idiom from popular culture, coined in the movie This Is Spinal Tap, which has come to refer to anything being exploited to its utmost abilities, or apparently exceeding them, such as a sound volume control.[150]
  • "Vanity of vanities --- all is vanity." - Bible, Ecclesiastes 1:2 KJV.[151]
  • TV a vast wasteland - Newton Norman Minow is an American attorney and former Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission. In a speech given to the National Association of Broadcasters convention on May 9, 1961 he referred to TV as a "vast wasteland".[152]
  • When it was railroad time, it was railroad time ... - “When railroading time comes you can railroad—but not before.” from Robert A. Heinlein's The Door Into Summer. It is an observation that technological breakthroughs can't occur until the state of the art reaches a critical level. Once it does, there can be multiple inventors of a similar technology.[153]
  • So why don't we get drunk and screw? ... country song ... - "Why Don't We Get Drunk" is a novelty song written and performed by Jimmy Buffett. It was a b-side to "The Great Filling Station Holdup", released in 1973. The first line of the chorus was: "Why don't we get drunk an' screw?"[154]
  • this winter of the earth's discontent - "Winter of our discontent" is the opening line from William Shakespeare's Richard III. It is also the title of John Steinbeck's last novel and using the Shakespeare quote as its source.[156]
  • With all the horseshit, he was bound to find a pony - Punch line to an old joke about an optimistic child digging into a pile of manure.[157]
  • you were there - You Are There is an American historical educational television and radio series broadcast over the CBS Radio and CBS Television networks from 1953 to 1957. It was hosted by Walter Cronkite who ended the episode with a summary and then the phrase "What sort of day was it? A day like all days, filled with those events that alter and illuminate our times... all things are as they were then, and you were there."[158]

ReferencesEdit

  1. Eruption, pg. 235, HC.
  2. Ibid, pg. 340.
  3. Ibid, pg. 252.
  4. Ibid, pg. 35.
  5. Ibid, pg. 201.
  6. Ibid, pg. 122.
  7. Ibid, pg. 372.
  8. Ibid, pg. 192.
  9. Ibid, pg. 214.
  10. Ibid, pg. 183.
  11. Ibid, pg. 369.
  12. Ibid, pg. 123.
  13. Ibid, pg. 138.
  14. Ibid, pg. 25.
  15. Ibid, pg. 74.
  16. Ibid, pg. 192.
  17. Ibid, pg. 125.
  18. Ibid, pg. 288.
  19. Ibid, pg. 239.
  20. Ibid, pg. 53.
  21. Ibid, pg. 63.
  22. Ibid, pg. 212.
  23. Ibid, pg. 214.
  24. Ibid, pg. 405.
  25. Ibid, pg. 263.
  26. Ibid, pg. 216.
  27. Ibid, pgs. 123, 229, 300.
  28. Ibid, pg. 158.
  29. Ibid, pg. 222.
  30. Ibid, pg. 123.
  31. Ibid, pg. 244.
  32. Ibid, pg. 76.
  33. Ibid, pg. 192.
  34. Ibid, pg. 30.
  35. Ibid, pg. 192.
  36. Ibid, pg. 124.
  37. Ibid, pg. 372.
  38. Ibid, pg. 74.
  39. Ibid, pg. 30.
  40. Ibid, pg. 2.
  41. Ibid, pg. 11.
  42. Ibid, pg. 306.
  43. Ibid, pgs. 251, 336.
  44. Ibid, pg. 399.
  45. Ibid, pg. 336.
  46. Ibid, pg. 126.
  47. Ibid, pg. 383.
  48. Ibid, pg. 151.
  49. Ibid, pg. 357.
  50. Ibid, pg. 76.
  51. Ibid, pg. 1.
  52. Ibid, pg. 25.
  53. Ibid, pg. 340.
  54. Ibid, pg. 71.
  55. Ibid, pg. 336.
  56. Ibid, pg. 131.
  57. Ibid, pg. 241.
  58. Ibid, pg. 264.
  59. Ibid, pg. 144.
  60. Ibid, pg. 17.
  61. Ibid, pg. 249.
  62. Ibid, pg. 123.
  63. Ibid, pg. 137.
  64. Ibid, pg. 378.
  65. Ibid, pg. 187.
  66. Ibid, pg. 220.
  67. Ibid, pg. 33.
  68. Ibid, pg. 375.
  69. Ibid, pg. 124.
  70. Ibid, pg. 193.
  71. Ibid, pg. 299.
  72. Ibid, pg. 217.
  73. Ibid, pg. 315.
  74. Ibid, pg. 49.
  75. Ibid, pg. 385.
  76. Ibid, pg. 146.
  77. Ibid, pg. 60.
  78. Ibid, pg. 314.
  79. Ibid, pg. 90.
  80. Ibid, pg. 295.
  81. Ibid, pg. 313.
  82. Ibid, pg. 122.
  83. Ibid, pg. 312.
  84. Ibid, pg. 244.
  85. Ibid, pg. 368.
  86. Ibid, pg. 378.
  87. Ibid, pgs. 59, 205.
  88. Ibid, pg. 217.
  89. Ibid, pg. 149.
  90. Ibid, pgs. 144, 350.
  91. Ibid, pg. 351.
  92. Ibid, pg. 349.
  93. Ibid, pg. 65.
  94. Ibid, pg. 244.
  95. Ibid, pg. 244.
  96. Ibid, pg. 216.
  97. Ibid, pg. 223.
  98. Ibid, pg. 312.
  99. Ibid, pg. 335.
  100. Ibid, pg. 232.
  101. Ibid, pg. 179.
  102. Ibid, pg. 300.
  103. Ibid, pg. 145.
  104. Ibid, pg. 213.
  105. Ibid, pg. 229.
  106. Ibid, pg. 98.
  107. Ibid, pg. 123.
  108. Ibid, pg. 315.
  109. Ibid, pg. 121.
  110. Ibid, pg. 367.
  111. Ibid, pg. 65.
  112. Ibid, pg. 17.
  113. Ibid, pg. 65.
  114. Ibid, pg. 144.
  115. Ibid, pg. 233.
  116. Ibid, pg. 331.
  117. Ibid, pg. 41.
  118. Ibid, pg. 259.
  119. Ibid, pg. 65.
  120. Ibid, pg. 219.
  121. Ibid, pg. 241.
  122. Ibid, pg. 349.
  123. Ibid, pg. 68.
  124. Ibid, pg. 312.
  125. Ibid, pg. 279.
  126. Ibid, pg. 55.
  127. Ibid, pg. 387.
  128. Ibid, pgs. 93, 188.
  129. Ibid, pg. 124.
  130. Ibid, pg. 205.
  131. Ibid, pg. 250.
  132. Ibid, pg. 270.
  133. Ibid, pg. 57.
  134. Ibid, pg. 250.
  135. Ibid, pg. 59.
  136. Ibid, pg. 335.
  137. Ibid, pg. 263.
  138. Ibid, pg. 2281.
  139. Ibid, pg. 233.
  140. Ibid, pg. 30.
  141. Ibid, pg. 146.
  142. Ibid, pg. 266.
  143. Ibid, pg. 115.
  144. Ibid, pgs. 241-242.
  145. Ibid, pg. 216.
  146. Ibid, pg. 112.
  147. Ibid, pg. 196.
  148. Ibid, pg. 144.
  149. Ibid, pg. 305.
  150. Ibid, pgs. 5, 145.
  151. Ibid, pg. 300.
  152. Ibid, pg. 248.
  153. Ibid, pg. 73.
  154. Ibid, pg. 121.
  155. Ibid, pg. 196.
  156. Ibid, pg. 381.
  157. Ibid, pg. 136.
  158. Ibid, pg. 416.

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